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1
"The Complete Ancestry of John Liwai Kalniopuuikapali-o-Molilele-ma-wai-o-Ahukini-Kau-Hawaii Ena":
Keaouakalanikupuapaikalaninui (k) married Kekuiapoiwa II, chief of Kona, Hawaii, no issue.

Keaouakalanikupuapaikalaninui is not the biological father of Kamehameha.

"The Complete Ancestry of John Liwai Kalniopuuikapali-o-Molilele-ma-wai-o-Ahukini-Kau-Hawaii Ena":
Kalaninuiamamao (k) married Kamakaimoku (w) and was born Kalaniopuu (k) King of Hawaii, Ka'u, Puna, and Kona, and was born Keaouakalanikupuapaikalaninui (k), father of Kamehameha I, but Kamehameha was not by him; Keaoua was married for seven years to his chiefly wife, but he did not have a child so Keaweaheulu (k), Kameeiamoku (k), Kamanawa (k) got Kahekiliahumanu (k), King of Maui, to come to Hawaii where Kekuiapoiwa was living and in this mating had that child, a famous conqueror, the seeker of chiefs, leader of the chiefs and in that did the chiefs increase. 
KEKUIAPOIWA (KEKUIAPOIWA II), (Kekuiapoiwa-a-Ha'ae) (Kekuiapoiwa-a-Ha'ae) (I40866)
 
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Ke?olo?ewa-a-Kamauaua was the second Alii Aimoku of Molokai. He reigned as the titular chieftain or King of the island of Molokai. He reigned during the close of the second migratory era. His family descends from Nanaulu, 14th generation descendant of Wakea and they were descendants of the first migration to Hawaii in the 6th century.

He was born the second son of Kamauaua, the 1st King of Molokai and his wife Hinakeha. His elder brother was Kaupeepee and his younger brothers were Haili and Uli-hala-nui.

He and his brothers had been raised from an early age to hate the newly arrived southern chiefs who had gained power over all of the islands with the exception of Molokai who still remain mostly ruled by the native chiefs. His elder brother was considered the heir-apparent but he gave up his birthright to fulfill his dream of exterminating the southern chiefs. So the right to the throne fell on Keoloewa. His brother, Kaupeepee, later was slain by Kana and Nikeu-Kalohe, sons of Hina, queen of Hilo who had eloped to Molokai with his brother.

The incident of his brother did not disturb his reign in any way. Keoloewa was noted as the head and progenitor of numerous powerful families throughout the archipelago whose pedigrees reach up to him and his wife Nuakea. [2] His wife Nuakea was the daughter of Keaunui and granddaughter of Maweke.[ From this marriage the Molokai royal family could trace their lineage to Maweke, the purest chief of the Nanaula line. His daughter Kapau-a-Nuakea succeeded him as the supreme sovereign of Molokai.

References:

Kalakaua, His Hawaiian Majesty. The Legends And Myths of Hawaii: The Fable and Folk-lore of a Strange People. Tokyo, Japan: Charles E. Tuttle Company Inc. of Rutland, Vermont & Tokyo Japan, 1972.

Abraham Fornander, An Account of the Polynesian Race: Its Origin and Migrations, Rutland, VT: Charles E. Tuttle Company, 1969. 
KE'OLO'EWA (KEOLOEWA-A-KAMAUA), (2nd Ali'iaimoku of Molokai) (2nd Ali'iaimoku of Molokai) (I43128)
 
3
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ABOUT THE NAME KAHAI (KAHA'I)

The original chief named Kahai was a famous explorer who traveled to Kahiki very early in the history of the Hawaiian chiefs. He was a hero to the Hawaiian chiefs and many of them called their sons by his name. So there are many chiefs whose names begin with or contain the name "Kahai".

But there are five chiefs who are known primarily as just "Kahai", beginning with the original Kahai. I have numbered these Kahai chiefs in the correct order by the time period in which they lived, based on their generational distance from Wakea, ancestor of all the chiefs. The name "Kahai" is often expressed "Kahai-moelea", being similar in relation to "John" and "Jonathan", and would "Kahai-moelea" be interchangeable with "Kahai" for all 5 of these chiefs.

The chiefs named Kahai are:

(1) KAHAI (I) "Kahai-a-Hema" was the son of Hema (k.) and Hinamaikehoa (Ulamakehoa, Luamahekoa) w.). Original Kahai who traveled to Kahiki. He is 31 generations from Wakea.

(2) KAHAI (II) "Kahai-a-Ho'onali'i" was the son of Ho'okamali'i (k.) and Keahiula (w.). He is 34 generations from Wakea and not closely related to the original Kahai before him, being his 18th cousin. The people of his time would have known of the original Kahai in living memory. This Kahai is from Kauai and his grandfather Moikeha was also voyaging chief like the original Kahai. Moikeha would have lived at about the same time as the original Kahai as well.

(3) KAHAI (III) "Kahai-a-Mano" was one of the sons of Manokalanipo (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai). He is 52 generations from Wakea. He is not closely related to the previous Kahai II, being his 18th cousin, 19 times removed. He is more closely related to the original Kahai I, being from the same family lineage, being this original Kahai's 1st cousin, 19 times removed.

(4) KAHAI (IV) called "Kahaimoeleaikaaikupou" or "Kahaimoeleaikaaikapukupou" was the son of Kalapana (Kalapana Kuioiomoa) (k.) and Makeamakaimalanahae (Maemalamaihanai) (w.). He is 60 generations from Wakea. His relation to the previous Kahai III is very, very distant (22nd cousins, 8 times removed). However, he is a direct descendant of the original Kahai (Kahai-a-Hema), being his 27th great grandson.

(5) KAHAI (V) "Kahai-a-Keeaumoku", was the son of the original Keeaumoku Nui (Keeaumoku I) and the grandson of King Kekaulikeikekahialiiokamokamoku. He is 73 generations from Wakea. He is from the same family lineage as the original Kahai, being his 1st cousin, 33 times removed.


DEAN KEKOOLANI
February 1, 2010
Kapolei, O'ahu, Hawaii 
KAHA'I (V) (KAHAI-A-KEEAUMOKU, KAHA'I) (I42326)
 
4
ABOUT THE NAME "PAUMAKUA"


Hawaiian traditions mention three Paumakuas:

(1) HAWAI'I ISLAND PAUMAKUA: "Paumakua-a-Hoohokulani", the son of Hakalanileo (k.) and Hoohokukalani (w.)

(2) MAUI PAUMAKUA: "Paumakua-a-Hua", the son of Hua-nui-i-ka-la-la'ila'i (k.) and Kapoea (w.)

(3) OAHU PAUMAKU: "Paumakua-a-Lonoho'onewa", the son of Pau (k.) and Kapalakuakalani (w.). But instead of being called "Paumakua-a-Pau", he is surnamed after his great-grandfather Lonoho'onewa and is known as "Paumakua-a-Lonoho'onewa". The Oahu chief Lonoho'ohewa was famous as a voyaging chief who he went to Kahiki. Paumakua followed in his ancestor's footsteps and also traveled to Kahiki. So he takes after his forefather Lonoho'onewa, hence, "Paumakua-a-Lonoho'onewa". Six generations after Paumakua, his own descendant Laamaikahiki would also continue the tradition of voyaging and travel to Kahiki. This is the famous Paumakua who was an explorer of places outside the Hawaiian Islands. His achievements and adventures are sometimes appropriated by the chiefs of Maui and Hawaii for their own ancestors who are also named Paumakua.

The two Paumakuas from Maui and Hawaii Island are frequently confused with one another in the Maui and Hawaii genealogies. This is because of technical weakness in the genealogies of Hawaii and Maui. Those genealogies from the southern part of the Hawaiian islands are in general weaker and inferior in quality and accuracy to the genealogies of O'ahu and Kauai in the north. The northern genealogies, which emphasize the Nanaulu and Maweke lineages are older, better maintained, less tampered with and are also generally more internally coherent than the southern genealogies from Maui and Hawaii.

The mixing of Paumakuas by the Maui and Hawaii chiefs is the kind of ambuiguity typical of those southern traditions, which need to always be cross referenced and verfied by the northern traditions, whenever possible.

DEAN KEKOOLANI
January 29, 2010
Kapolei, O'ahu, Hawaii

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SOLOMON L.K. PELEIOHOLANI ON THE PAUMAKUAS

From Genealogy of the Robinson family, and ancient legends and chants of Hawaii:

"Some genealogies give the name of Paumakua's parents Huanuikalani, the father and Kapea, the mother. There were two Paumakuas known in Hawaiian traditions: a Hawaii Paumakua and a Maui Paumakua. The latter was the son of Huanuikalailai. It is said that [there is also] an Oahu Paumakua [who] was born a Kuaaohe in Kailua, Koolaupoko. His [great-grand] father's name was Lonohoonewa. That the voyages of the Oahu Paumaku to foriegn lands, 'and his exploits and adventures promiscuosly ascribed by later legends to Paumakua, the ancestor of Hawaii and Maui chiefs".

[ ] brackets above by DEAN KEKOOLANI

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ABOUT S.M. KAMAKAU AND THE PAUMAKUAS ("TALES & TRADITIONS")
(by Dean Kekoolani)

Two of the chiefs named Paumakuas are frequently mixed up: the Maui Paumakua and The Hawaii Island Paumakua. Both have genealogical ties to the Maui chiefs. But one is explicitely claimed and regarded by all as a Hawaii Island chief and the other a Maui Island chief. But often people still don't know who they are talking about the genealogies and disambiguation become necessary at some point.

S.M. Kamakau himself admits he is not sure which Paumakua he is trying to describe in Part 1 of "Tales & Traditions of People of Old", noting only that he knows the Paumakua he is concerned with can be traced back to Hema through one of his ancestors, the chiefess Mano-ka-lili-lani.

Today, using forensic genealogy techniques, we can calculate that Kamakau was talking about the Hawaii Island Paumakua (Paumakua-a-Hoohokukalani). This Paumakua is 13 generations from Hema through Mano-ka-lili-lani.

The other Paumakua (Paumakua-a-Hua) was the Maui Paumakua and was born two generations earlier, being 11 generations from Hema and is related to the chiefess Mano-ka-lili-lani but is not her direct descendant.

Unfortunately, in the same passage, he also incorrectly attributes the travels of the Oahu Paumakua (Paumakua-a-Lonoho'onewa) to this particular Paumakua.

However, appears to redemm himself later in Part 2 of "Tales & Traditions of People of Old" by giving us a detailed description of the O'ahu Paumakus (Paumakua-a-Lonoho'onewa ) when he discusses the history of chiefs traveling to Kahiki.

So the deficiency Kamakau appears to display in Part 1 is not his fault, but rather due to the construction of the book itself, which was put together from newspaper articles long after Kamakau died. It is unfortunate that the editors of "Tales and Traditions" did not annotate the text to show in Part 1 that Kamakau knew about all the Paumakuas and was aware of who traveled to Kahiki and that this would be addressed in Part 2 later. This lack of explanation is a disservice to S.M. Kamakau. In my opinion, this needs to be corrected by the publishers of future editions with a footnote and not just an entry in the notes section later. It's a minor fix and a fair one to expect. 
PAUMAKUA (PAUMAKUA-A-HUA), (Maui Paumakua) (Maui Paumakua) (I40417)
 
5
Additional (unverified) HALL genealogy
MARCH 2009
From website http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/a/l/Charles-L-Hall/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0062.html 
HALL, Rebecca (Malea Becky) (I41951)
 
6
Additional (unverified) HALL genealogy
MARCH 2009
From website http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/a/l/Charles-L-Hall/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0062.html 
HALL, Annie (I41952)
 
7
FULL NAME:
Kalani Pai?ea Wohi o Kaleikini Keali?ikui Kamehameha o ?Iolani i Kaiwikapu kaui Ka Liholiho K?nui?kea.

THE IDENTITY OF THE BIOLOGICAL PARENTS OF KAMEHAMEHA THE GREAT is a disputed matter.

Contrary to popular history, there is a strong case to be made that Kamehameha was originally a member of the Maui royal family and that he was transferred to the Big Island and adopted by the ruling chief and his wife. They became his parents of record.

This has not been settled (c. 2010) and probably can't be settled. It doesn't need to be settled. However, there is no question about whom Kamehameha the Great treated as his father, and that was the great chief Keoua Kalani-kupu'uapai-kalani-nui Ahilapalapa. By tradition, the Hawaiian people follow this line of genealogy because Kamehameha himself did. It is probably a good practise. When fully understood, the ancient custom of hanai and the seriousness of it in Hawaiian culture makes clear to those who understand that Keoua was very much indeed Kamehameha's "real" father. All Hawaiians will understand that to be the truth. It is this family of Keoua that formed the royal court around Kamehameha the Great.

However, in our genealogy practise we follow the blood-line tradition from Maui (taught by our kupuna the genealogist SLK Peleioholani), which tells us that Kamehameha was not the natural biological son of Keoua Kalani-kupu'uapai-kalani-nui Ahilapalapa and Kekupoiwa Nui but rather given as a gift to them by his true biological parents from Maui. These biological parents were Kahekili (Ruling Chief of Maui) and his sister Ku, the son and daughter of Kekaulike (Ruling Chief of Maui). This Maui genealogy would make Kamehameha a full NINAU PI'O chief (the mother and father are full blooded brother and sister and children of ruling chief). This was a rare This would have made him the highest ranking male chief, by blood, in all the Hawaiian Islands. It may have been possible, with this exalted chiefl;y rank anbd all its honors and kapus, to assume complete control over all the islands without going to war, based on his bloodline alone. Such male chiefs are rare, the closest living male in Kamehameha's time being Keawemauhili (who possessed certain "intertwined kapus" from birth which were rare but not as exalted as the NINAU PI'O of Kamehameha).

When Kamehameha was gifted in "hanai" by Maui to the Big Island and it's rulers Keoua Kalani-kupu'uapai-kalani-nui Ahilapalapa and Kekupoiwa Nui, the social and political ramifications of Kamehameha's exceptionally high birth rank upon the fortunes and power of Maui's current elites were neutralized, at least for for the time being. This disappearance of the male infant Kamehameha was very convenient for all the othe other male chiefs of Maui, especially Kamehameha's father Kahekili and uncle Kamahemahanui Ailuau (who he was named after).

END OF THE KAMEHAMEHA DYNASTY

There was a controversy at the time of Kalakaua's election as to the quality of his bloodline and whether he was fit to sit on the throne of Hawaii. Also, there was a controversy about the special election itself, which brought him to power. It is now forgotten that there was a great tumult surrounding the elections results. Not everyone supported Kalakaua. People did riot when they heard Kalakaua had won. There were accusations that Kalakaua had cheated his opponent the beloved Queen Emma (widow of King Kamehameha IV) out of a victory with his political machinations. Many chiefs, especially the very old guard, refused their support and would not attend the Kalakaua court. This is now forgotten. But in its time this was a great controversy, a dark cloud that hung over the Kalakaua Dynasty's possession of the throne and some say it is why they could not hold on to it.

Nonetheless,in due time they did establish themselves firmly in the hearts of the people and their claim was secured. The Kamehameha line (and the Keoua line) lost their seniority in regal succession when the Kalakaua Dynasty came to power and legitamized their government by gaining acceptance by the people of Hawaii Nei. The expression of the warm and sincere acceptance by the Hawaiian people can be seen in their love for Queen Liliuokalani and also for the Princess Victoria Kaiulani.

The current heirs of the Kalakaua Dynasty would be the Kawananakoa family. 
KAMEHAMEHA I THE GREAT (PAIEA K?NUIAKEA KAMEHAMEHA), (King of Hawaii) (King of Hawaii) (I42107)
 
8
THE CHIEFLY MAUI HERTIAGE OF LILIHA

Liliha was the hanai (adopted) daughter of Hoapili-'ulu-maheihei. Governess of Oahu 1829-1831. Today, she is believed to be his natural daughter. This happens all the time to hanai children and to some degree it is what is supposed to happen.

However, the facts of her genealogy are that she is the daughter of Kalaniulumoku II and Loeau, who were themselves full blooded brother and sister (children of Kalaniulumoku I and his own mother the venrable Kalanikuiokikilo). This makes Liliha a ninaupio child, a chiefess of the highest possible princely rank in the system of Hawaiian chiefs. She is,in fact, one of the last ninaupi'o persons to be born in Hawaii. The only other ninaupio chief to be born this late in Hawaii's history is probably Akaka Kukalani (the daughter of the brother-sister marriage of King Kahahana's son and daughter).

Before Liliha and Akaka Kukalani, the ninaupi'o chiefs were:

* Keopuolani (wife of Kamehameha) - daughter of Kiwalao (Kiwala'o) and Liliha Kekuipoiwa (Kekuipoiwa III), who were full blooded brother and sister, not half blooded as suggested by some genealogies. The fact that she was ninaupi'o is the reason why her husband Kamehameha was required to prostrate fully face down to the ground in her presence.

* Kalanikauiokikilo - daughter of King Kamehamehanui Ailua and his sister Kalola, the children of King Keakaulike. Kalola was also the mother of the above stated Liliha Kekuipoiwa and Kiwala'o.

It is this Kalanikauiokikilo who mated with her own son from her father to give birth Liliha's father and mother, this is the order:
(1) King Kekaulike + Kekuipoiwa Nui (half-brother and sister) = Kamehamehanui and Kalola (son and daughter)
(2) Kamehamehanui + Kalola = Kalanikauiokikilo (ninaupio chiefess)
(3) Kamehamehanui + Kalanikauikikilo (his daughter) = Kalaniulumoku I
(4) Kalaniulumoku I + Kalanikuiokikilo (his mother) = Kalaniulumoku II & Loeau (son and daughter)
(5) Kalaniulumoku II & Loeau = Liliha

We understand now that this is the real reason that Liliha commanded such respect in her lifetime and enjoyed many privileges amd also why her several husbands were of such high rank. Everyone knew that she was only hanai to Hoapili-ulu-maheihei and that in her veins flowed the ninaupio blood of theof the Maui royal family ran through her veins, so she was indulged and forgiven often.

Her true genealogy is the reason why her daughter with Namaile was named "Jane Loeau", after her own true biolical mother "Loeau". Also, this is why Jane Loeau was educated at the Royal School. Liliha's true genealogy is given in two works by noted Hawaiian genealogist S.L.K. Pelioholani.



DEAN KEKOOLANI
January 30, 2010
Kapolei, O'ahu, Hawaii 
LOEAU (LOEAU I) (I41772)
 
9
There are 3 chiefs and one royal prince named Lu'anu'u:

(1) LU'ANU'U I, son of Lukahakono - 15 generations after Wakea
(2) LU'ANU'U II, son of Laka (Laka-noho-i-ka-wehiwehi, Lakaimihau) - 33 generations after Wakea
(3) LU'ANU'U III, son of Kamahana - 48 generations after Wakea

The grandson of Kamehameha the Great is H.R.H. Prince Kahalaia Luanu'u. Technically this royal prince would be Chief Lu'anuu IV.

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NOTE FOR LUANUU I (LUANUU-O-LUKAHAKONA):

S.L.K. Peleioholani gives the name "Kaealuanui"* for Luanuu I in his Robinson Family genealogy, and gives only his wife and issue, not his parents, as follows:

FATHER: Lu'anu'u (Lu'anu'u I, Kaealuanui, Luanuu-a-Lukahakona)
MOTHER: Kawaamaukele - 10 generations from Wakea
ISSUES: Hinakoula (Hinakoulu), Kukii (Kii)

*SLK Peleioholani does say that this Kaealuanui is called Luanuu by others. We know he is "Luanuu I" because the wife given by Peleioholani exactly matches the one given for Kamakau's chief "Luanuu I".

S.M. Kamakau gives a different genealogy with more generations for this Luanuu than SLK PEleioholani, as follows

Kio / Kamole / Ole
Ole / Hai / Pupue
Pupue / Kamahele / Manaku
Manaku / Hikoale / Kahiko
Kahiko / Kaea / Lukahakona
Lukahakona / Kawaamakele / Ki'i 
LU'ANU'U (LU'ANU'U I, KAEALUANUI, LUANUU-A-LUKAHAKONA) (I40390)
 
10
There are two conflictiong genealogical traditions which treat PUPUE either as a man or woman.

SLK Peleiholani teaches the path of the female PUPUE in his ROBINSON FAMILY GENEALOGY.

For PUPUE, S.M. Kamakau gives a different genealogy with more generations than SLK Peleioholani, as follows

Kio / Kamole / Ole
Ole / Hai / Pupue
Pupue / Kamahele / Manaku
Manaku / Hikoale / Kahiko
Kahiko / Kaea / Lukahakona
Lukahakona / Kawaamakele / Ki'i

FROM:
KA NUPEPA KUOKOA Feb 29,1868
Reprinted in Ruling Chiefs of HAwaii (Appendix) 
PUPUE, (kane) - (Southern 'Ulu Tradition) (kane) - (Southern 'Ulu Tradition) (I42035)
 
11 Hina-a-ke-ka is the name used by S.M. Kamakau. HINAAKEKA (HINAAKEKA II, HINA-A-KE-KA, HINAKAPAIKUA, HINAIKAPAIKUA) (I40716)
 
12 The Hon. Alii Poki [Boki] Kama'ule'ule (lost at sea during an expedition to the New Hebrides, December 1829), Governor of Oahu, second son of Alii Kekuamanoha, by his first wife, Kamakahu-kilani, daughter of Kamakahu-kilani.

Called Poki by S.M. Kamakau. 
POKI (BOKI), Kama'ule'ule Kama'ule'ule (I42270)
 
13 !MARRIAGE:HRH Prince Michael of Albany's 'The Forgotten MonarchyofScotland; ; ; Tree #0167; ; Date of Import: 18 Sep 1998 FITZ GEOFFREY, Hawise (I6289)
 
14 "Aunt Tootsie" DOWSETT, Elizabeth Jane Lanakila (Tutsy) (I42869)
 
15 "Betsy (1823-Mar. 12, 1874,) md. Angus MacDonald, (1814- June 22, 1884,)son of Dougald 'Mohr' MacDonald) on Feb. 22, 1847. They lived atMalignant Cove. He was appt'd a Justice of the Peace in 1864. They had afamily of at least eight. One son, Willie, married a niece of FatherRonald MacGillivray. Father Anthony MacDonald of Antigonish Diocease,along with his brother Rickie and sister Margie, are great-grandchildrenof Angus and Betsy (Ross) MacDonald, being the children of Dougald, (whomd. Jean MacDonald) son of Willie, son of Angus." ROSS, Elizabeth (I5122)
 
16 "Ce 13me décembre 1632 en l'eglise Nostre dame de Brouage a este baptizeeMarie fille de pierre Miville Souice & Charlotte Maugin sa femme a esteparrain pierre Riche et marine Corset. Bessoneau Vicaire" MIVILLE, Marie (I3602)
 
17 "feu" when E.A. was married LEFEBVRE, Guillaume (I2074)
 
18 "Fragments of Genealogy" is a collection of genealogies gathered on Lanai by Mary Kawena Pukui. This copy was at the LDS Family History Center, Kalihi, Oahu, Hawaii. Shown to me by Genealogist Charles Ahlo. (Dean Kekoolani, 2003) Source (S343)
 
19 "Hawaiian Genealogies" is a collection of rare genealogies gathered, transcribed and edited by Mary Kawena Pukui. This copy was at the LDS Family History Center, Kalihi, Oahu, Hawaii. Source (S377)
 
20 "Hawaiian Genealogies" is a collection of rare genealogies gathered, transcribed and edited by Mary Kawena Pukui. This copy was at the LDS Family History Center, Kalihi, Oahu, Hawaii. Source (S417)
 
21 "Hawaiian Genealogies" is a collection of rare genealogies gathered, transcribed and edited by Mary Kawena Pukui. This copy was at the LDS Family History Center, Kalihi, Oahu, Hawaii. Source (S424)
 
22 "Hawaiian Genealogies" is a collection of rare genealogies gathered, transcribed and edited by Mary Kawena Pukui. This copy was at the LDS Family History Center, Kalihi, Oahu, Hawaii. Source (S453)
 
23 "Hawaiian Genealogies" is a collection of rare genealogies gathered, transcribed and edited by Mary Kawena Pukui. This copy was at the LDS Family History Center, Kalihi, Oahu, Hawaii. Source (S461)
 
24 "Hawaiian Genealogies" is a collection of rare genealogies gathered, transcribed and edited by Mary Kawena Pukui. This copy was at the LDS Family History Center, Kalihi, Oahu, Hawaii. Shown to me by Genealogist Charles Ahlo. (Dean Kekoolani, 2003). Source (S363)
 
25 "Hawaiian Journal of History" V 27, 1992-1996 lists as Colonel BOYD, Col. James Aalapuna Harbottle (I40761)
 
26 "Hawaiian Journal Of History" V30, 1992-1996 lists Maria Boyd as
a Composer 
ADAMS, Maria Hio (Mary, Malaea) (I40613)
 
27 "In memory of Angus McDonald of French River. Died August 9, 1835, aged80. Cairid na chiad Gaeil a thainigin duthch" (friend of the firstHighlanders who came to the country) (GILLIS) MACDONALD, Angus (I3805)
 
28 "JOHN JAMES ROSS The Gulf Shore lost a staunch citizen in the death athis Arisaig home June 13th of John James Ross, aged 86, following threeweeks illness. Son of the late Donald and Margaret (Gillis) Ross, he wasborn at Pleasant Valley, and moved with his parents to Arisaig when aninfant. Mr. Ross became a key-man in the community life of Arisaigparish. Neighbors and others sought his wise counsel and readyassistance in times of perplexity and trouble. He was a kindly man whoenjoyed helping others and seeing people prospering and happy. Goodfortune to neighbors brought gladness to his great heart. As asuccessful farmer and fisherman he understood freely the successes anddisappointments of the North Shore people. St. Margaret's church, inparticular, will miss his sincere and loyal support, for Mr. Ross wasits warden for nearly forty years. He was married twice, the first wife,Margaret MacDougall, Arisaig, predeasing him by 47 years. Survivingchildren are a son Dan, and a daughter, Christy, Mrs. Herman Paterson,Roxbury, Mass. The second Mrs. Ross, his widow, was the former SarahMacDonald, daughter of Alexander MacDonald, McArra's Brook, and Mary(Grant) MacDonald, Knoydart. There are four children surviving from thisunion: Andrew, California; Alexander, Arisaig; John, R.C.A.F.; Margaret,Mrs. Charles Oliver, Brighton, Mass. A brother, W. J. Ross, Antigonish:a sister Mrs. Alexander MacDonald, Brighton, Mass, and 13 grandchildrenalso survive. The funeral was largely attended. Solemn requiem Mass inSt. Margaret's Church was celebrated by Rev. D.C. MacEachern.P.P.,assisted by Rev. C.F. Ross as deacon, and Rev. A. Ross, sub-deacon,cousins of the deceased, and Rev. Neil MacKenzie, master of ceremonies.Pall bearers were Allan R. MacDonald, Donald MacDonald, AndrewMacDonald, C. D. Gillis, Archibald MacInnis, Hugh D. MacDonald and DanJ. MacDonald. R.I.P.
CARD OF THANKS Mrs. J.J.Ross and family wish to convey their gratefulthanks to all who sent Mass Cards and flowers and who in any other wayexpressed sympathy and tendered assistance during thier recentbereavement; they are particularly grateful to their pastor, Rev. D.MacEachern, Rev. A. Ross, Boisdale, Rev. F. Ross, Maryvale and Rev. NeilA. MacKenzie,." 
ROSS, John James (I3865)
 
29 "Ka'iana" is the spelling given by Kamakau (July 6, 1865 Ka Nupepea Kuokoa). He ia the grandson of King Keaweikekahialliokamoku.

Kaiana rebelled against Kamehameha at Battle of Nuuanu. 
KA'IANA (KAIANA) (I42159)
 
30 "Kahaimoeleaikaaikupou" is the name given by the genealogist S.L.K. Peleioholani.


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ABOUT THE NAME KAHAI (KAHA'I)

The original chief named Kahai was a famous explorer who traveled to Kahiki very early in the history of the Hawaiian chiefs. He was a hero to the Hawaiian chiefs and many of them called their sons by his name. So there are many chiefs whose names begin with or contain the name "Kahai".

But there are five chiefs who are known primarily as just "Kahai", beginning with the original Kahai. I have numbered these Kahai chiefs in the correct order by the time period in which they lived, based on their generational distance from Wakea, ancestor of all the chiefs. The name "Kahai" is often expressed "Kahai-moelea", being similar in relation to "John" and "Jonathan", and would "Kahai-moelea" be interchangeable with "Kahai" for all 5 of these chiefs.

The chiefs named Kahai are:

(1) KAHAI (I) "Kahai-a-Hema" was the son of Hema (k.) and Hinamaikehoa (Ulamakehoa, Luamahekoa) w.). Original Kahai who traveled to Kahiki. He is 31 generations from Wakea.

(2) KAHAI (II) "Kahai-a-Ho'onali'i" was the son of Ho'okamali'i (k.) and Keahiula (w.). He is 34 generations from Wakea and not closely related to the original Kahai before him, being his 18th cousin. The people of his time would have known of the original Kahai in living memory. This Kahai is from Kauai and his grandfather Moikeha was also voyaging chief like the original Kahai. Moikeha would have lived at about the same time as the original Kahai as well.

(3) KAHAI (III) "Kahai-a-Mano" was one of the sons of Manokalanipo (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai). He is 52 generations from Wakea. He is not closely related to the previous Kahai II, being his 18th cousin, 19 times removed. He is more closely related to the original Kahai I, being from the same family lineage, being this original Kahai's 1st cousin, 19 times removed.

(4) KAHAI (IV) called "Kahaimoeleaikaaikupou" or "Kahaimoeleaikaaikapukupou" was the son of Kalapana (Kalapana Kuioiomoa) (k.) and Makeamakaimalanahae (Maemalamaihanai) (w.). He is 60 generations from Wakea. His relation to the previous Kahai III is very, very distant (22nd cousins, 8 times removed). However, he is a direct descendant of the original Kahai (Kahai-a-Hema), being his 27th great grandson.

(5) KAHAI (V) "Kahai-a-Keeaumoku", was the son of the original Keeaumoku Nui (Keeaumoku I) and the grandson of King Kekaulikeikekahialiiokamokamoku. He is 73 generations from Wakea. He is from the same family lineage as the original Kahai, being his 1st cousin, 33 times removed.


DEAN KEKOOLANI
February 1, 2010
Kapolei, O'ahu, Hawaii 
KAHA'I (IV) (KAHAIMOELEAIKAAIKUPOU, MAHAIMOELEAIKAAIKUPOUKAHAIMOELEAIKAAIKAPUKUPOU) (I40431)
 
31 "Kamea-a-Lu'anu'u" is the name used by S.M. Kamakau.
Abraham Forander, David Malo and Kamakau say he was "Kamea",son of Kapohuleiula and Luanuu (not Laamea).

"Kaomea" is the correct name used by genealogist Solomon Peleioholani, who says he is the son of Laamea, not Luanuu. In the Robinson Family genealogy, Peleioholani specifically mentions that the claim Kamea is the son of Luanuu is wrong. 
KA'OMEA (KAMEA) (I40412)
 
32 "Kapo-a-Kauluhailea" is the name given by the genealogist S.L.K. Peleioholani. Called "Huailikapu" in Kumu Hawaii article (newspaper) published 1835. KAPO-A-KAULUHAILEA (KAPOAKAULUKAILAA, HUAILIKAPU) (I40523)
 
33 "Keleanohoapiapi" is the shorter version of her name used by S.L.K. Peleioholani in Robinson Family Genealogy and the JOhn Ena Genealogy.

CORRECTION ON 11-15-2003: She was moved in our lists from being the sister of Kahekili (I) to being the daughter, to conform with Forander (Ancient History of the Hawaiian People, page 82).

From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):
Keleanohoanaapiapi (w) niaupio married Lolale, chief of Halona; born was Kaholialale (k) of Halona, born was Luliwahialale (w) of Halona. These are the Chiefs of Halona; many and plentiful are the royal offsprings.

From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):
Kelea (w) remarried, to Kalamakua (k), chief of Halawa. Born was Laielohelohe (w), who pi'o married Piilani (k).

Look at Keleanohoanaapiapi (w), the own sister of Kawao Kaohele (k), the chiefly king surrounding Maui until Piilani (k).
1. Here are the ancestors - Kawaokaohele (k), King of Maui.
2. Keleanohoanaapiapi (w), Queen of Maui.
3. Piilani (k), King of Maui.
4. Kihaapiilani (k). King of Maui.
5. Kamalalawalu (k). King of Maui.
6. Kauhiakama (k), King of Maui.
7. Kaianikaumakaowakea (k), King of Maui.
8. Lonohonuakini (k). King of Maui.
9. Kaulahea (k) II, King of Maui.
10. Kekaulikekalanikuihonoikamoku (k). King of Maui.
11. Kamehamehanui (k). King of Maui.
12. Kahekili (k), last King of Maui.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Kelea is the shorthand name used by Kamakau. 
KELEANUINOHOANA'API'API, (Kelea, Kelea-nui-noho-'ana-'api'api) Ruing Queen of Maui (Kelea, Kelea-nui-noho-'ana-'api'a (I40766)
 
34 "Kepalaoa" is the name given by S.L.K. Peleioholani in the Robinson Family Genealogy. She is the mother of Haua, wife of Umi and of King Piilani of Maui. "Kohe-palaoa" one version of the name used by S.M. Kamakau. "Kepalaoa" is the name given by Kamakau in Tales & Traditions. KOHEPALAOA (KEPALAOA, KOHE-PALAOA, KOHIPALAOA), (Kumuhonua Chiefess, Ninaupi'o) (Kumuhonua Chiefess, Ninaupi'o) (I41139)
 
35 "Kupelehuwaihele" is the name given in the Hawaii Board of Genealogy Records manuscript. The HAwaii board of Genealogy also gives parents that do not appear in other accoiunts. So we have two sets of parents in our database. We cannot determine at thsi date which is the correct biological parent, and who might be perhaps the hanai parents.

- Dean Kekoolani (03-27-2010) 
KAPULEHUAIHELE (KUPELEHUWAIHELE, KAPOLEHU, KAPULEHU-NAIHELE) (I42057)
 
36 "Lolele" and "Lo-Lele" is the form of the name used by S.L.K. Peleioholani in his Robinson Family Genealogy. He calls him "Lolale" in his John Ena genealogy.

From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):
Keleanohoanaapiapi (w) niaupio married Lolale, chief of Halona; born was Kaholialale (k) of Halona, born was Luliwahialale (w) of Halona. These are the Chiefs of Halona; many and plentiful are the royal offsprings.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

FORNANDER:
"Kalona-iki appears to have followed in the footsteps of his father, and observed the laws and policy inaugurated by him. The island was quiet and continued prosperous. No attacks from abroad, no convulsions within, have been remembered in the legends during his time. His wife was Kikinui-a-Ewa. Her parents are not mentioned, but it is said that she belonged to the great family of Ewauli-a-lakona, the great-grandson of Maweke. Kalona-iki's children, as known, were Piliwale, Lo-Lale, and Kamaleamaka. The first succeeded him as Moi, the second we have already referred to, and of the third nothing more is known." 
LO-LALE (L?-LALE. L?-LELE, L?LELE, L?LALE, LALI, OLALI), (L? Chief of Halona) (L? Chief of Halona) (I41589)
 
37 "Lono-a-Keawe" is an alternate name/title from Mary Pukui.

This is the chief for whom the famous Kumulipo chant (a mele inoa, or name chant) was recited a birth.

He was the head of the senior Keawe lineage. Through his mother,'s lineage he received various honors and kapus from the islands of Maui and Oahu. He married his full sister Kauhiokeka. He then married his daughter Kekaulike, who was born from that marriage to his sister. The child produced from this marriage to his daughter was the reknown chief Keawemauili whose famous "intertwined kapus" wer produced by his complicated lineage.

He was assasinated by his brother, Ke'eaumoku-nui (head of the junior Keawe line), having had issue.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ABOUT KEAWE
From "The Complete Ancestry of John Liwai Kalniopuuikapali-o-Molilele-ma-wai-o-Ahukini-Kau-Hawaii Ena"
(S.L.K. Pelioholani)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Look at the chiefly children of Keawe (k), King of Hawaii: (1) Children Kalaninuiiamamao (k), Kekohimoku (w), Keakakauhiwaamoku (k), five children of Molokai, including Kumukoa.

Look at Kalaninuiiamamao (k); he was the own father of King Kalaniopuu (k) and his children.

Kalaninuiamamao (k) married Kamakaimoku (w) and was born Kalaniopuu (k) King of Hawaii, Ka'u, Puna, and Kona, and was born Keaouakalanikupuapaikalaninui (k), father of Kamehameha I, but Kamehameha was not by him; Keaoua was married for seven years to his chiefly wife, but he did not have a child so Keaweaheulu (k), Kameeiamoku (k), Kamanawa (k) got Kahekiliahumanu (k), King of Maui, to come to Hawaii where Kekuiapoiwa was living and in this mating had that child, a famous conqueror, the seeker of chiefs, leader of the chiefs and in that did the chiefs increase.

Kalaninuiamamao (k) hoao niaupio married Kauhiokeka (w), his sister; born was Kekaulikeikawekiuonalani (w), ancestor of S. L. Kalaniomaiheuila Peleioholani (k) and Laura M Kekupuohikapulikoliko (w) and Kahiwaokalani (w), grandmother of the princes D. Kawananakoa and J. Kalanianaole.

Kalaninuiamamao (k) married his own daughter, Kekaulikeikawekiuonaiani (w)- born was Keawemauhili, who was iwiiapuu and iwilakee due to his kapu.

Look at the chief Kalaniopuu (k), he is the own grandson of Umiulaikaahumanu (w) (true chiefly class) and Kuanuuanu (k) of Waianae, Oahu. Look closely at Kalaninuiiamamao, the own father of Kalaniopuu (k). A high chief. And here are the chiefly descendants that are seen in the broad daylight. 
KALANINUIIAMAMAO (KALANI-NUI-'I-A-MAMAO, KA'I'IMAMAO, LONO-A-KEAWE), (Ali'i-o-Ka'u) (Ali'i-o-Ka'u) (I41088)
 
38 "mentionned circa 813" Tzautzes Strategos of Macedonia (I5327)
 
39 "Morte en sa cabane au Cap Diamant" PETITPAS, Marguerite (I2768)
 
40 "Niau pio" son because his father and mother are half-brother and half-sister. MANAUEA (I40555)
 
41 "Niau pio" son because his father and mother are half-brother and half-sister. HUKULANI (HUKILANI) (I40554)
 
42 "Niau pio" son because his father and mother are half-brother and half-sister. KAHOUKAPU, (Mo'i, Ruler of Hawaii) (Mo'i, Ruler of Hawaii) (I40434)
 
43 "Pierre Martin laboureur avec sa femme et un enfant demeurant a Bourguel" etait au nombre des passagers VIGNEAU, Catherine (I1166)
 
44 "Pierre Martin laboureur avec sa femme et un enfant demeurant a Bourguel" etait au nombre des passagers MARTIN, Pierre (I1165)
 
45 "Ross at Arisaig on Monday 15th inst., in the 29th year of age, MargaretMcDougall, beloved wife of John J. Ross leaving a sorrowing husband tomourn the loss of an affectionate partner and 2 young children to facethis cold and bitter world without the guiding hand and tender care of aloving mother. Strenghtened by all the consolations of holy religionunder the eyes and prayers of her spititual father, she calmly breathedher life away with the light of hope into life eternal illuminating hercountenance. Hers were the mildness of disposition and kindliness ofmanner." MACDOUGAL, Margaret (I4583)
 
46 "Royal and Noble Genealogies of Hawaii" confirms that Kaaikumoku married Akaka Kukalani and Kalola-a-Kumukoa.
The Dusen family is said to be descended from Kalola-a-Kumukoa and Kaaikumoku.

Kaaikumoku Kaimualiiokamoku, who mightbe the same person, is the father of Hattie Kaumu. 
KA'AIKUMOKU (KA'AIKUMOKU II) (I40720)
 
47 "subregulus" of Kent, Essex, Sussex and Surrey in 825 or 828, andsucceeded his father as King of Wessex on 4 feb, 839. In 855 he resignedWessex to his son Ethelbald and confined his own authority to Kent,Sussex and Essex as "Subregulus". King Aethelwulf King of England (I4749)
 
48 "The Complete Ancestry of John Liwai Kalniopuuikapali-o-Molilele-ma-wai-o-Ahukini-Kau-Hawaii Ena":
Kalaninuiamamao (k) married Kamakaimoku (w) and was born Kalaniopuu (k) King of Hawaii, Ka'u, Puna, and Kona, and was born Keaouakalanikupuapaikalaninui (k), father of Kamehameha I, but Kamehameha was not by him; Keaoua was married for seven years to his chiefly wife, but he did not have a child so Keaweaheulu (k), Kameeiamoku (k), Kamanawa (k) got Kahekiliahumanu (k), King of Maui, to come to Hawaii where Kekuiapoiwa was living and in this mating had that child, a famous conqueror, the seeker of chiefs, leader of the chiefs and in that did the chiefs increase.

In this same genealogy, Solomon says the mother of Kamehameha the Conqueror in Kekupoiwa II. The contradiction is never explained by him - see below

From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):
Look at Kuhooheiheipahu (w) and Kahekili (k), they being the true chiefly parents of Kamehameha I, Kalanikupule (k), and Koalaukani (k).

The mother is of Kalanikupule is sometimes given as Kauwahine.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

FORNANDER:

"Kalanikupule departed for Maui, accompanied by his aunt, Kalola, the widow of Kalaniopuu, and by her new husband, Kaopuiki; by her daughters, Kekuiapoiwa Liliha, widow of Kiwalao, and Kalanikauikikilo; and by her granddaughter, Keopuolani. His brother Koalaukane, and his uncle Kamohomoho, and a noted warrior chief named Kapakahili, were also sent off as his aids and counsellors."

"Kalanikupule, his brother Koalaukani, Kamohomoho, and some other chiefs escaped over the mountain and made their way to Oahu. Kalaniakua, Kekuiapoiwa Liliha, and her daughter Keopuolani, crossed over to Olowalu, where they joined their mother, Kalola, and after a hurried preparation they all left for Molokai, and took up their residence with Kekuelilcenui at Kalamaula." 
KOALAUKANE (I40987)
 
49 "Thirty acres of land is granted unto William Nelson lying on the Northside of Jones River Meddow on both sides of the brooke that goes fromMr. Joseph Bradford's; so that it not be prejudicial to the neighbours" NELSON, William (I1496)
 
50 "was the first known Cobb to emigrate from England to the PlymouthColony, Cape Cod, MA. Many distinguished descendants have long searchedfor his English origin and background. In developing this vignette ofthe immigrant I have drawn liberally from the scholarly works of PhilipL. Cobb, author of The Cobb Family (1907), Richard Cobb, Harvardprofessor and Richard Cobb a retired Navy Supply Corps Captain. However,the hypotheses and conclusions contained herein are my own. (TracyAshley Crocker Sr.)

Much is known on the activities of Henry Cobb, the Puritan, in theBay Colony but little has been done to unravel the specifics of hisorigin. There is general agreement that "The Elder Henry or the DeaconHenry Cobb" came from an area in County Kent east of the Medway Riverwhich flows out of the hills of southern Kent through Maidstone andChatham and into the Thames Estuary. It is within this area thatinhabitants are called "Men of Kent" (Jutish origin); those to the westof the Medway are known as "Kentish Men" (Saxon origin). ProfessorRichard Cobb, through study and acquaintance with the Cape Coddescendants of Henry Cobb, suggests that as a young man Henry Cobb was"rather short, with blue eyes and reddish sandy hair." Interesting, asthis description agrees with the perceived appearance of the GermanicJutes who invaded and settled in Great Britain in the 5th century.
The most visible trail of "Henry the Elder" in England is found inhis relationship with his church leader, the Reverend John Lothrop.Lothrop, "a man of good family and education" was baptized at Eton on 20December 1584. He received BA and MA degrees at Queens College,Cambridge. In 1611 we find him with the established Church of England atEgerton, Kent, a distance of about 15 miles from the probable home ofHenry Cobb in Reculver, Kent. Obviously disenchanted with the autocraticdogma of the King's Church, the Reverend Lothrop is found as minister ofan independent church in London in 1623; and then on 29 April 1632, wefind him imprisoned in London with 40 members of his flock for violatingthe laws relating to religious gatherings. Following two yearsimprisonment, Lothrop left England in the ship "Griffin" with his familyand some members of his church for the Plymouth colony, arriving there18 September 1634. Here Henry Cobb, the Lothrop protege who had been inthe Colony for about five years, responded to the call of his old friendand esteemed pastor. He aided the Reverend in getting his family andchurch established in the newly formed town of Scituate. Lothrop'srecords published in the New England Register, Volumes IX and X, leaveslittle doubt of Henry Cobb's membership in Lothrop's London church:
"Uppon January 8, 1634, Wee had a day of humiliation and then atnight joyned in covenaunt together, so many of us had beene in covenauntbefore. To Witt.
Mr. Gilsonn and his wife
Goodman Anniball and his wife
Goodman Rowly and his wife
Goodman Cobb and his wife
Goodman Turner
Edward Foster
Myselfe
Goodman Foxwell
Samuel House."

It is very probable that immigrant Henry Cobb of Plymouth andAmbrose Cobb of the Virgina Colony were of the same Kent Family, theyshared a common progenitor in John Cobb, Esquire (b. ca 1300) of Cobb'sCourt, Romney, Kent. The suggested (but undocumented) relationshipsshown are based primarily on the association of the family names,locations, and dates. That is, Henry Cobb of Plymouth Colony wouldappear to be a second son of Henry Cobb (1561-1617) of Reculver, Kent.The son Henry was born about 1605. (He married Patience Hurst inPlymouth in 1631; English Yeoman of his time, married at age 26, thusthe basis for his date of birth). Most men of Kent were farmers in anarea famous for hops, fruit, and grain. Even in this age, importance wasattached to the idea of status. The term "Yeoman" was commonly used inlegal and other documents to denote status above "Husbandman" (smaller,less prosperous farmer) and below that of "Gentleman" (upper middleclass). Yeomen, from whom Henry Cobb was descended, were reasonably welleducated. Some Yeomen sons attended the universities; some becameclergymen. A review of the Cobbs of Kent and a person inspection of theManor houses at Reculver and Eastleigh Court suggest 16th century gentrybut 17th century Yeomen. Suffice it to say that the emigrant Henry Cobbdid not inherit his father's estate. The major inheritance, by custom,probably went to Benjamin Cobb, the first-born son. This situation, aswell as the significant influence of Reverend Lothrop, could have giventhe impressionable 18 year old Henry Cobb ample justification to seek anapprenticeship in the shops or pubs of London in 1623, the year thatLothrop formed his church there. The influence of the charismatic Lotropon the Cobbs of Reculver must have been substantial. The Cobb home atReculver was about 15 miles from Egerton, Kent where Lothrop was inresidence from 1611 to 1623. Henry Cobb, the assumed father of theemigrant Henry, was himself censured by the establishment. He had becomeLord of the Manor of Bishopstone, Reculver Kent, when his father Richarddied in 1582. In the record of the Visitations of Archdeacon ofCanterbury in 1599 is found the following "We present these personswhose names are hereunder written for they refuse to pay unto a cessmade by divers of our parish for the reparation of our said church:.....Henry Cobb 3 shillings, 10 pence (owed)."
The nature of Henry Cobb's apprenticeship or trade in London isopen to conjecture. The fact that he came from an area rich in hops andgrain and later in the Colony he was authorized to dispense winesuggests the production and/or sale of ale, the national beverage of theera. From the Plymouth Colony Record 1173; "5 June 1644, Henry Cobb islycensed to draw wine at Barnstable."
What better place than an English pub in the 17th century to keepabreast of politics, religion and emigration. Henry Cobb of London mustcertainly have been aware of a number of significant events, viz: Thatin 1604, in a declaration at Hampton Court, James I said of thePuritans, "I shall make them conform themselves or I will harry them outof the Land or else do worst." Henry must have known the story of anundereducated group of separatists called "Pilgrims" who sough refugefirst in Amsterdam and subsequently in Leyden, Holland; and theunwilling to be assimilated into the Dutch culture, made their way toPlymouth in 1620 aboard the "Mayflower". (of the 101 passengers on thefirst voyage of the Mayflower, 35 were Leyden adventurers.) In 1628 thePuritans of Henry Cobb's sect began their mass exodus. In 1630 JohnWinthrop, a strong and able leader, led nearly 1000 Puritans with theircattle and horses to settlements in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Ingeneral the Puritans were a wealthier and better educated class than thePilgrims but they shared their deeply religious convictions. It wasshortly after the Winthrop departure that Henry Cobb made his move,probably in the ship "The Anne" in 1629. Other possible ships include "Mayflower II' and the "Little James", which also arrived at Cape Cod in1629. Professor Cobb said in his character analysis of Henry, theemigrant, that he was "sensible, shrewd, adverse to making trouble orbeing a part of it." Cobb didn't linger in London long enough to bejailed in the famous "clink" with the zealous Lothrop and his followersin 1632. When the great Civil War of 1642 came about to settle thequestion of supremacy between King and Parliament, High Church andPuritans, Henry Cobb is found saving souls and selling wine inMassachusetts."
(John E. Cobb, Col., US Army) 
COBB, Elder Henry (I1472)
 
51 '..was one of the first settlers in New Haven, Conn. and was born inRoyton in Lenham, Kent. His descent can be traced to Thomas Atwater ofRoyton, who died in 1484.' [p.396 of Jost] Lived and died in districtnow called Cedar Hill. 'David was one of the original planters of NewHaven. He bought land in Wallingford for his oldest son Joshua, who diedbefore he could take possession of it, so the next son, John, became oneof the first settlers in Wallingford.' [correspondence of Clare('Tag')Duprey, 1981] ATWATER, David (I1073)
 
52 '2nd earl, who, in the 1st year of Richard I., had a charter datedatWestminster, 27 November, constituting him Earl of Norfolk, andstewardof the household, his lordship obtaining at the same timerestitution ofsome manors, with grants of others, and confirmatkionof all his widespreading demesnes. Upon the return of King Richard from his captivity,the Earl ofNorfolk assisted at the great council held by the king atNottingham;and at his second cornonation, his lordship was one of thefour earlsthat carried the silken canopy over the monarch's head. In thereignof King John he was one of the barons that extorted the greatChartersof Freedom from that prince,and was amongst the twenty-fivelordsappointed to enforce their fulfilment.' (BurkeG-53) Magna CartaSurety 1215 He was the Earl of Norfolk & Suffolk. BIGOD, Roger Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk (I6659)
 
53 'became Sister Avelina of the Sisters of Mercy.' CONNORS, Margaret (I4021)
 
54 'Before 1218, Margaret founded an Augustinian convent in memory ofherparents and brother on land donated by King John at AconburyinHerefordshire, near the village of Holme Lacy. She was buriedtherein the Priory Church, which is now disused and locked.' DE BRAOSE, Margaret (I6419)
 
55 'Captain.' RANDALL, Elisha Atkins (I3903)
 
56 'Civil and Criminal Leutenant (Judge) for Quebec in 1651. Around July 20,1652 established himself in Lauzon. Today the Grand Trunk Station standswhere he lived. Recv'd degree in Paris. May 19, 1633. SEVESTRE, Charles (I2495)
 
57 'died unmarried' TUTTLE, David (I3950)
 
58 'French Canadian and Acadian Genealogical Review', Spring 1968. Page16-26. He signed his name as 'Guion', and it is from him that Guyon, andmany Dion and Dionnes descend. His godfathers are Jean Collin and PierreDolivet, and godmother Catherine Goddin. He grew up in Tourouvre, on May18, 1614, he signed at loan to Pantaleon Bigot, a farmer from Autheuil,a sum consisting of: 'a small gold pistol, pieces of fifty-two sons,quarters of crowns and other silver pieces'. For a value of about 84pounds. He was already a mason although only 24 years of age, was verysuccessful. Jean built the old stairs of the steeple tower of the churchat Tourouvre in 1615. He was then living in the parish of St-Jean deMortagne, province of Perche, France. GUYON, Jean (I2214)
 
59 'Hugh Bigod, 3rd earl, who m. Maud, eldest dau. of William Mareschal,Earlof Pembroke, and by her (who m. 2ndly, William Earl of WarrenneandSurrey,) had issue, I. Roger, his successor. II. Hugh, an eminentlawyer.III.Ralph, m. Berta, dau. of the Baron Furnival . . . Hislordship, whowas also one of the twenty-five barons appointed toenforce theobservance of Magna Charta, d. in 1225 . . . ' (BurkeG-53) Surety of theMagna Carta. He was third Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk.He was born before1195, and took part from the beginning in theBarons' Magna Chartaproceedings. Not many particulars of this Baron'slife have beenpreserved, as he enjoyed for only a few years the titleof Earl ofNorfolk and Suffolk, and his father's estates and honors,to which he hadsucceeded in the 5th of King Henry III. He died fouryears later, inFebruary 1224/5, having married about 1212 Maud, asister of the SuretyWilliam Marshall. In her right, Hugh acquired theEarldom of Pembroke,and in this rank bore the royal sceptre at thecoronation of King Richard BIGOD, Hugh (I6429)
 
60 'If he accompanied his father to Nova Scotia, he at least remained herebut a short time.' [Jost, page 397] ATWATER, Abel Ward (I3958)
 
61 'Lived at North Haven.' TUTTLE, Jonathan (I3949)
 
62 'm. Richard Edwards of New Haven. (Timothy Edwards of Windsor?)'Evidently, there is some question about Elizabeth's husband. TUTTLE, Elizabeth (I3952)
 
63 'Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth Century Colonists', David Faris,1996 Source (S202)
 
64 'Richard I, the Lion-hearted, spent much of his youth in hismother'scourt at Poitiers. Richard cared much more for thecontinentalpossessions of his mother than for England - he also caredmuch morefor his mother than for his father. Family considerationsinfluencedmuch of his life: he fought along side of his brothers PrinceHenryand Geoffrey in their rebellion of 1173-4; he fought for hisfatheragainst his brothers when they supported an 1183 revolt inAquitane;and he joined Philip II of France against his father in1188,defeating Henry in 1189. 'Richard spent but six months of histen-year reign in England. Heacted upon a promise to his father to jointhe Third Crusade anddeparted for the Holy Land in 1190 (accompanied byhis partner-rivalPhilip II of France). In 1191, he conquered Cyprus enroute toJerusalem and performed admirably against Saladin, nearly takingtheholy city twice. Philip II, in the meantime, returned to Franceandschemed with Richard's brother John. The Crusade failed initsprimary objective of liberating the Holy Land from Moslem Turks,butdid have a positive result - easier access to the region forChristianpilgrims through a truce with Saladin. Richard received word ofJohn'streachery and decided to return home; he was captured by Leopold VofAustria and imprisoned by Holy Roman Emperor Henry VI.Theadministrative machinery of Henry II insured the continuance ofroyalauthority, as Richard was unable to return to his realm until1194.Upon his return, he crushed a coup attempt by John and regainedlandslost to Philip II during the German captivity. Richard's warwithPhilip continued sporadically until the French were finallydefeatednear Gisors in 1198. 'Richard died April 6, 1199, from a woundreceived in a skirmish atthe castle of Chalus in the Limousin. Near hisdeath, Richard finallyreconciled his position with his late father, asevidenced by SirRichard Baker in A Chronicle of the Kings of England:'The remorse forhis undutifulness towards his father, was living in himtill he died;for at his death he remembered it with bewailing, anddesired to beburied as near him as might be, perhaps as thinking theyshould meetthe sooner, that he might ask him forgiveness in anotherworld.'Richard's prowess and courage in battle earned him the nicknameCoeurDe Lion ('heart of the lion'), but the training of his mother'scourtis revealed in a verse Richard composed during his germancaptivity: 'No one will tell me the cause of mysorrow Whythey have made me a prisoner here.Wherefore with dolour I now makemy moan; Friends had Imany but help have I none. Shameful it isthatthey leave me to ransom, To languish here twowinters long.' Reigned 1189-1199. Prisoner in Germany 1192-1194. Ahero of Medievallegends spent all but 6 months of his reign abroad. Hebecame Duke ofAquitaine in 1168 and of Poitiers in 1172. He joined the3rd crusadein 1189 and conquered Messina and Cyprus before arriving inthe HolyLand. His victory at Arsuf gained Joppa (1191). On his way homehe wasaptured in Austria and was only released by Emporer Henry VIafterpayment of an enourmous ransom (1194). He returned briefly toEnglandbut died in France. Most sources agree that he died withoutissue, but there are some thatclaim he had this one child. I have noproof of either. It is alwaysa possiblity that he left descendants, butin this case as he wasroyalty and well documented it is doubtful.However I added it to myancestry because it is a possibility. Pleaseuse with caution. PLANTAGENET, Richard 'The Lionheart' (I6390)
 
65 (80 ans env.) BRUN, Andrée (I4501)
 
66 (85 ans) PELLERIN, Catherine dit Colbec (I2429)
 
67 (90 ans env.) GAUTROT, Marie (I5013)
 
68 (Ancestry of John Ena / SLK Peleioholani):
Genealogy of Kaikilanimaipanio (w). Akahiilikapu (w) married Kahakumakalina (k); born were Kawaihalaniwailuau** and Keliiohiohi (k) for whom the prostrating kapu of Pihenaakalani for these chiefs this chiefly kapus of Pihenaakalani. (**She is also called Koihalawai in many other genealogies.) 
KAWAIHALANIWAILUAU, (Kawaihalau, Koihalauwailaua, Koihalawai, ) (Kawaihalau, Koihalauwailaua, Koih (I41022)
 
69 (Ancestry of John Ena / SLK Peleioholani):
Genealogy of Kaikilanimaipanio (w). Akahiilikapu (w) married Kahakumakalina (k); born were Kawaihalaniwailuau** and Keliiohiohi (k) for whom the prostrating kapu of Pihenaakalani for these chiefs this chiefly kapus of Pihenaakalani. (**She is also called Koihalawai in many other genealogies.) 
KELIIOHIOHI (KELII-'OHI'OHI) (I42202)
 
70 (David La?amea Kahalepouli Kinoiki Kaw?nanakoa Pi?ikoi)

EDUCATION:
St. Albans and Punahou Colls., Hawaii; St. Matthew's Episcopalian Sch. for Boys, San Mateo, California, USA; and the Royal Agricultural Coll., Cirencester, England. Adopted by Queen Kapi'olani. Granted the title of Prince and style of His Royal Highness, 1883. Appointed Heir Presumptive after Victoria Kauilani, 29th March 1891. PC and Clerk Dept. of Foreign Affairs, Special Cmsnr. to the USA 1893. Succeeded as Heir Apparent 6th March 1899. 
KAWANANAKOA, David La'amea Kahalepouli (HRH Prince Kawanakakoa) (I42095)
 
71 (Gravel 4-5) Family F1457
 
72 (inventaire Genaple 1688/08/07) DU MONTIER DE LEURE, Marie Madeleine (I2481)
 
73 (Member of the Legislative Council) CORBETT, Honorable John Edward MLC (I783)
 
74 (Message regarding David Kalani and Hattie Kahahana Peleioholani)

From:
Robert Ebanez
January 17, 2009

Aloha Miliaulani: Our kupuna name was Nancy Kahahana Kalani married Edward Aiwohi. Nancy's parents were David Peleioholani Kalani who married his first cousin Harriet Kahahana Peleioholani. If your kupuna on the Aiwohi line is the same they can contact me anytime. Malama ponoBobby 
PELEIOHOLANI, Harriet Kahahana (Hattie) (I40895)
 
75 (Mother Keliiopunui LDS) ADAMS, David (II) (I40775)
 
76 (Mother Keliiopunui LDS) ADAMS, Sarah Kaniaulono (I40782)
 
77 (Mother: Kalanikaukeha LDS) ADAMS, Henrietta (I40769)
 
78 (The Genealogy of the Royal Descendants Living in the Presence of Queen Liliuokalani) Source (S437)
 
79 * BIOGRAPHY
Henry was born in 1068 in Selby, Yorkshire, the only child ofWilliam the Conqueror to be born in England. He was also the only son tobe born in 'purple' as only two years previously William had become kingof England. As the youngest child he was his mother's favourite and whenshe died she left him her English estates.

He had a good education, learning to read and write Latin as wellas English and Law. In 1086 he was knighted by his father. When hisfather died in 1087 his brother Robert received the duchy of Normandywhile William II Rufus became king of England. Henry, having estates inboth territories like so many other Norman barons, had to maintain hisrelations with two overlords.

When in 1100 William Rufus mysteriously died, Henry was elected tosucceed as king of England and on 6 August he was crowned in WestminsterAbbey. His first act as king was to restore Anselm as archbishop ofCanterbury, then he started to look for a bride. For his queen heselected Edith of Scotland, daughter of King Malcolm Canmore and, moreimportantly, of St. Margaret of Wessex who was a descendant of the kingsof England prior to the Conquest. In honour of the king's mother,Matilda of Flanders, Edith changed her name to Matilda. Restoring Anselmdid not ensure peace in the kingdom as he refused to do homage to theking, claiming to hold the church estates in the name of the pope.Anselm was then forced into exile, and peace was restored only in 1107when the king's sister Adela, countess of Blois, found a solutionacceptable to both: bishops would pay homage to the king and the kingwould allow clerical investiture.

When Henry's brother Robert Curthose, duke of Normandy returnedfrom Crusade he proved such a bad ruler that the barons in Normandyrevolted and asked for Henry's support. Henry was also motivated by awish to eliminate the continuing threat from Robert and the drain on hisfiscal resources from the annual payment to him, so in 1105 he led anexpeditionary force across the English Channel. On the morning of 28September 1106, exactly 40 years after their father had landed inEngland, the decisive battle between his two sons took place in thesmall village of Tinchebray. Robert's army was defeated and he wascaptured. Robert was imprisoned and Henry became duke of Normandy.

Henry was a good diplomat; even though troubles within Normandyand with France continued, he made a successful alliance when his onlydaughter Matilda married the Emperor Heinrich V in 1114. In 1119 hisonly son William went to the continent and married a daughter of thecount of Anjou. On the journey home the 'White Ship' was wrecked andWilliam with his entourage drowned. Henry's wife had died in 1118, buthe waited until 1122 before taking a second wife, Adeliza of Louvain. Hehad fathered two legitimate and probably nineteen illegitimate children,but his second marriage remained childless.

In 1126 Henry designated his daughter, the widowed EmpressMatilda, as his successor; and in 1127 he selected Geoffrey, count ofAnjou, as her second husband even though he was ten years younger thanMatilda. Henry travelled a great deal between England and Normandy, andon 1 August 1135 he left England for the last time. He died 1 December1135 at St. Denis-le-Fermont near Gisors. His body was taken back toEngland and buried at Reading Abbey.

From Encylcopedia Britannica Onlines, article entitled Henry I 'Also,HENRY BEAUCLERC (GOOD SCHOLAR), French HENRI BEAUCLERC youngestandablest of William I the Conqueror's sons, who as king ofEngland(1100-35) strengthened the crown's executive powers and, likehisfather, also ruled Normandy (from1106).' 'Henry I was a skillful,intelligent monarch who achieved peace inEngland, relative stability inNormandy, and notable administrativeadvances on both sides of theChannel. Under Henry, the Anglo-Normanstate his father had created wasreunited. Royal justices began makingsystematic tours of the Englishshires, but, although hisadministrative policies were highly efficient,they were notinfrequently regarded as oppressive. His reign marked asignificantadvance from the informal, personal monarchy of former timestowardthe bureaucratized state that lay in the future. It also markedashift from the wide-ranging imperialism of earlier Norman leaderstoconsolidation and internal development. In the generationsbeforeHenry's accession, Norman dukes, magnates, and adventurershadconquered southern Italy, Sicily, Antioch, and England. Henry wonhismajor battles but preferred diplomacy or bribery to the risks ofthebattlefield. Subduing Normandy in 1106, he contented himselfwithkeeping domestic peace, defending his Anglo-Norman stateagainstrebellion and invasion, and making alliances withneighbouringprinces.' 
King Henry I of England (I7903)
 
80 * BIOGRAPHY
Wratislaw was born about 888, the son of Borziwoy I, duke of Bohemia,and Ludmilla, heiress of Psov (later canonised, who is venerated as apatroness of Bohemia). He was the younger brother of Spitignew I, whosucceeded their father as duke of Bohemia. Spitignew is rememberedsolely for his 895 alliance with Arnulf, duke of Bavaria (the Diet ofAugsburg). which separated Bohemia from Great Moravia. Designed toprotect Bohemia against the ravages of Magyar raiders, this pact alsoopened Bohemia to East Frankish Carolingian culture and paved the wayfor the eventual triumph of Roman Catholicism in Czech spiritualaffairs. Spitignew died in 915 and was succeeded by Wratislaw.

About 906 Wratislaw married Drahomira von Stodar. They had threesons and three daughters, of whom their son Boleslaw would have progeny.Wratislaw died in battle against the Magyars. His date of death isgenerally given as 13 February 921. He was succeeded by his 13-year-oldson Wenceslas, who ruled Bohemia from the age of 18 but was murdered in935 by a group of nobles allied with his younger brother Boleslaw.Wenceslas was canonised, and remains the patron saint of the Czechpeople. 
AV OD BOHEMIA, Duke Vratisl I, Duke of Bohemia (I57)
 
81 * Elizabeth Kekaikuihala Kekaaniauokalani Kalaninuiohilaukapu
* Elizabeth Kekaaniau Pratt (Mrs. Pratt)

Princess Elizabeth Keka?aniau La?anui or Elizabeth Kekaikuihala Kekaaniauokalani Kalaninuiohilaukapu La?anui (September 12, 1834–December 20, 1928) was a great grandniece of Kamehameha I, being a great granddaughter of Prince Kalokuokamaile, the older brother of Kamehameha I. She was born in her family home at Waialua. She was given the name Elizabeth after her mother's adoptive mother Queen Elizabeth Ka?ahumanu and the Hawaiian name after Princess Kekaikuihala, her father's elder sister. Her full birth name was Elizabeth Kekaikuihala Kekaaniauokalani Kalaninuiohilaukapu Laanui. She was 10 years old when Kamehameha III placed her in the Chiefs' Children's School, also known as the Royal School, a select school for the children of the highest rank in the kingdom who eligible to be rulers. She was taught by missionaries Mr. and Mrs. Amos Star Cooke. Her cousins Queen Emma and Bernice Pauahi, called her Lizzie.

Her father was High Chief Gideon Peleioholani La?anui who escaped the slaughter of Kawaihae when Keoua Kuahuula was killed. Her mother was High Chiefess Theresa Owana Kaheiheimalie Rives, a relative of Queen Ka?ahumanu and daughter of Kamehameha II's French Secretary. Through her father's first marriage to Lydia Namahana, she was the step-niece of the Queen Ka?ahumanu. Elizabeth married Frank Seaver Pratt, General Council of the Hawaiian Kingdom, in 1864. They did not have any children of their own, although they adopted her niece, Theresa Laanui, (daughter of her brother, Gideon Laanui II).

In 1920, at the age of 86, Princess Elizabeth wrote a book, Keoua Father of Kings, a tribute to her renowned ancestor Keoua Kalanikupuapaikalaninui and his son, Kamehameha I. It was republished in 1999 by her great-great nephew, David Castro. It was republished again in 2009.

At the death bed of King Kamehameha V, he had asked Elizabeth to be his successor. She declined at the time, as did Princess Bernice Pauahi. Princess Elizabeth was the last survivor of the Royal School. She outlived the entire House of Kal?kaua, and was the only surviving relative from the House of Kamehameha to live into the 20th century. She died at the age of 94 in Honolulu, Oahu in 1928.

FROM:
Elizabeth Kekaaniauokalani Kalaninuiohilaukapu Pratt (2009) [1920]. History of Keoua Kalanikupuapa-i-nui: father of Hawaii kings, and his descendants. T. H., republished by Kessinger Publishing. ISBN 9781104766610. 
KEKAANIAU (KE-KA-A-NI'AU), Elizabeth (I42067)
 
82 * REMARKS:
1st King of Scots (or King of Alba)

* BIOGRAPHY
Kenneth was born about 800, the son of Alpin, king of Kintyre.Kenneth was king of the Picts and, according to national myth, firstking of Scots, earning him the posthumous epithet 'An Ferbasach' ('TheConqueror'). His undisputed legacy was to produce a dynasty of rulerswho claimed descent from him. Even though he cannot be regarded as thefather of Scotland, he was the founder of the dynasty which ruled thatcountry for much of the medieval period.

Kenneth's origins are uncertain, as are his ties, if any, toprevious kings of the Picts of Dál Riata (the Gaelic over-kingdom on thewestern seaboard of Scotland with some territory on the northern coastsof Ireland). Medieval genealogies are unreliable sources, but somehistorians accept Kenneth's descent from the Cenél nGabrain of DálRiata.

Although later traditions provided details of his reign and death,Kenneth's father Alpin is not listed as among the kings in the _DuanAlbanach_ (Song of the Scots), the Middle Gaelic poem found with the_Lebor Bretnach,_ a Gaelic version of the _Historia Brittonum_attributed to Nennius. The idea that Kenneth was a Gael is not entirelyrejected, but modern historiography distinguishes between Kenneth as aGael by culture, and perhaps in ancestry, and Kenneth as a king ofGaelic Dál Riata. Kenneth could well have been the first sort of Gael.Kings of the Picts before him, from Bridei, son of Der-Ilei, his brotherNechtan as well as Oengus I (Angus I), son of Fergus and his presumeddescendants, were all at least partly Gallicised. The idea that theGaelic names of Pictish kings in Irish annals represented translationsof Pictish ones was challenged by the discovery of the inscription_Custantin filius Fircus(sa),_ the latinised name of the Pictish kingCaustantin, son of Fergus, on the Dupplin Cross.

Kenneth's rise to power can be placed in the context of the recentend of the previous dynasty, which had dominated Fortriu (an ancientPictish kingdom, often used synonymously with Pictland in general) fortwo or four generations. This followed the death of King Uen, son ofOengus of Fortriu, his brother Bran, Aed mac Boanta and many others inbattle against the Vikings in 839. The resulting succession crisisseems, if the Pictish Chronicle's king-lists have any validity, to haveresulted in at least four would-be kings warring for supreme power.

Kenneth's reign is dated from 843, but it was probably not until848 that he defeated the last of his rivals for power. The _PictishChronicle_ claims that he was king in Dál Riata for two years beforebecoming Pictish king in 843, but this is not generally accepted. In849, Kenneth had relics of St. Columba, which may have included theMonymusk Reliquary, transferred from Iona to Dunkeld. Other than theseare bare facts, the _Chronicle of the Kings of Alba_ reports that heinvaded Saxonia six times, captured Melrose and burnt Dunbar, and alsothat Vikings laid waste to Pictland, reaching far into the interior.

The reign of Kenneth also saw an increased degree of Norsesettlement in the outlying areas of modern Scotland. The Shetlands, theOrkneys, Caithness, Sutherland, the Western Isles and the Isle of Man,and part of Ross were settled; the links between Kenneth's kingdom andIreland were weakened, those with southern England and the continentalmost broken. In the face of this, Kenneth and his successors wereforced to consolidate their position in their kingdom, and the unionbetween the Picts and the Gaels, already progressing for severalcenturies, began to strengthen. By the time of Donald II, the kingswould be called neither of the Gaels nor of the Scots, but of Alba.

Kenneth died from a tumour on 13 February 858 at the palace ofCinnbelachoir, perhaps near Scone. The annals report the death as thatof the 'king of the Picts', not the 'king of Alba'. The title 'king ofAlba' is not used until the time of Kenneth's grandsons Donald II(Domnall mac Causatin) and Constantine II (Constantin mac Aeda). TheFragmentary Annals of Ireland quote a verse lamenting Kenneth's death:Because Cináerd with many troops lives no longer there is weeping inevery house; there is no king of his worth under heaven as far as theborders of Rome.

Kenneth left at least two sons, Constantine and Aed, who werelater kings, and at least two daughters. One daughter married Run, kingof Strathclyde, and Eochaid mac Run, king of the Picts, resulted fromthis marriage. Kenneth's daughter Máerl Muire married two importantIrish kings. Her first husband was Aed Finliath of the Cenél nEógain.Niall Glúndub, ancestor of the O'Neill, was the son of this marriage.Her second husband was Flann Sinna of Clann Cholmáin.

FROM: P L Kessler , ...The History Files, HomePublishing A(c)1999, www.users.globalnet.co.uk\\_plk\\history.htm,Internet. 843 AD Kenneth rules from Scone (Fortriu, modern Forteviot),capital of the Southern Picts. 850 AD Kenneth rules Pictland andunites most of the country, a feat which is extended to cover allScotland by subsequent kings.

succeeded his father as King of Galloway and other parts of Scotland on20 July or in August 834, and became King of the area known as Dalriadain 841. In 843/4, he became King of the Picts, thus uniting the oldGaelic kingdoms of Alba for the first time, and by 846 he was firmlyestablished as King of Scotland. 
MAC ALPIN, Kenneth I King of Scots and Picts (I5297)
 
83 * REMARKS:
Crusader 1099

* BIOGRAPHY
Hugues was born in 1057, the son of Henri I, king of France, andAnna of Kiev. He was the younger brother of King Philippe I. After 1067he married Adelaide, comtesse de Vermandois et de Valois, only child ofHeribert IV, comte de Vermandois et de Valois and Adèle, comtesse deValois. Hugues and Adelaide had five children of whom four would haveprogeny.

In early 1096 Hugues and Philippe began discussing the FirstCrusade after news of the Council of Clermont reached them in Paris.Although Philippe could not participate, as he had been excommunicated,Hugues was said to have been influenced to join the Crusade after aneclipse of the moon on 11 February 1096.

That summer Hugues' army left France for Italy, where they wouldcross the Adriatic Sea into territory of the Byzantine empire, unlikethe other Crusader armies which were travelling by land. On the way,many of the soldiers led by fellow Crusader Emicho von Leiningen joinedHugues' army after Emicho was defeated by the Hungarians, whose land hehad been pillaging. Hugues crossed the Adriatic from Bari in SouthernItaly, but many of his ships were destroyed in a storm off the Byzantineport of Dyrrhachium.

Hugues and most of his army were rescued and escorted toConstantinople, where they arrived in November 1096. Prior to hisarrival, Hugues sent an arrogant, insulting letter to the Eastern RomanEmperor Alexius I Comnenos, according to the emperor's biography by hisdaughter (the _Alexiad_), demanding that Alexius meet with him.

'Know, O King, that I am King of Kings, and superior to all whoare under the sky. You are now permitted to greet me, on my arrival, andto receive me with magnificence, as befits my nobility.'

Alexius was already weary of the armies about to arrive, after theunruly mob led by Peter the Hermit had passed through earlier in theyear. Alexius kept Hugues in custody in a monastery until Hugues sworean oath of vassalage to him.

After the Crusaders had successfully made their way across Seljukterritory and, in 1098, captured Antioch, Hugues was sent back toConstantinople to appeal for reinforcements from Alexius. Alexius wasuninterested, however, and Hugues, instead of returning to Antioch tohelp plan the siege of Jerusalem, went back to France. There he wasscorned for not having fulfilled his vow as a crusader to complete apilgrimage to Jerusalem, and Pope Paschal II threatened to excommunicatehim. He joined the minor Crusade of 1101, but was wounded in battle withthe Turks in Asia Minor about 5 September, and died of his wounds on 18October in Tarsus.

In 1103 his widow Adelaide married Renaud, comte deClermont-en-Beauvaisis, and they had two children. Adelaide died on 28September 1120 or 1124. 
DE FRANCE, Hugues , Count of Vermandois (I6)
 
84 *** NOTE: EXTENSIVE NOTES FOR THIS INDIVIDUAL - GO PAST THESE NOTES TO SEE THE WIFE AND CHILDREN
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kapi'iwi Kekuaokalani

Also Known As:
* Ka'owa Kekua-o-Kalani
* Keaoua Kekua-o-kalani
* Kaiwi-Kuamo?o Kekua-o-kalani
* Kapi'iwi Kekuaokalani
* Kapii'iwi o-ke Akua-o-kalani


FROM ANCESTRY OF JOHN LIWA ENA (SLK Peleioholani):
Genealogy of Huaimanono (w), grandmother of Kekuaokalaninui, who was killed in battle at Kuamoo, Kona, and for whom this name is called upon her grandchild, L. A. Kekuakapuokekuaokalani Coney, and her younger sibling.

KEEPER OF THE WAR GOD KUKAILIMOKU

Keeper of the war god Kukailimoku, and defended him when he was attacked after the breaking of the taboos in 1819.

Keaoua Kekua-o-kalani (sometimes known as Kaiwi-kuamo?o Kekua-o-kalani) was a nephew of Kamehameha I, the chief from the Big Island of Hawai?i who had unified the Hawaiian islands. He was the son of Kamehameha's half brother Keali?imaikai and Kamehameha's half-sister Ki?ilaweau. After Kamehameha died in 1819, Keaoua rebelled against Kamehameha's successor, his son Liholiho. Keaoua's rebellion was brief; he was killed in battle about 21 December 1819.

After Kamehameha died, on 8 May 1819, power was officially assumed by Kamehameha's son Liholiho. Liholiho, at the urging of powerful female chiefs such as Ka?ahumanu, abolished the kapu system that had governed life in Hawai?i for centuries. Henceforth, men and women could eat together, women could eat formerly forbidden foods, and official worship at the stone platform temples, or heiaus, was discontinued. This event is called the ?Ai Noa, or free eating. As the historian Gavan Daws points out (Daws, 1967, pp. 54-59), this was a decision taken by the chiefs, and it primarily affected the state religion. Commoners could still worship their family protective deities, their aumakua; hula teachers could make offerings to Laka and Big Island Hawaiians could make offerings to the goddess Pele.
[edit]Rebellion

Nonetheless, some of the chiefs felt that if they were to abandon the kapus and the services at the heiaus, they would lose the religious justification and support for their rule. Liholiho, they felt, was courting disaster, and must be opposed, lest he take down everyone with him.
Keaoua Kekuaokalani was a Big Island noble. He was the son of Kamehameha's younger brother and if Liholiho were to die or be overthrown, would have a good claim to the throne. He was outraged by the abandonment of the old sacred traditions and withdrew from the royal court, then staying at Kailua-Kona, on the Big Island, and retired to Ka?awaloa at Kealakekua Bay. Many opponents of the ?Ai Noa joined him in his self-imposed exile and urged him to try for the throne, saying, "The chief who prays to the god, he is the chief who will hold the rule." (Kamakau, 1961, p. 226) Some of the Hawaiians living in Hamakua, on the north coast of the Big Island, rebelled outright and killed some soldiers sent against them. The situation was perilous.
[edit]The emissaries

The king, Liholiho, and his chiefs took counsel and decided to send emissaries to Keaoua, asking him to abandon his defiance, return to Kailua, and join in the free eating again. Keaoua received the emissaries with apparent deference and said he was ready to return to Kailua the next day, but would not join in the free eating. The emissaries retired to rest, thinking the problem solved.

According to Kamakau, Keaoua's supporters spent the night arguing with their leader, urging him to kill the emissaries and mount a decisive rebellion, Keaoua forbade any assassinations but the next morning, when he and his followers were to board canoes for the return to Kailua, he refused. He said he and his men (drawn up in ranks, in warrior regalia) would go by land.

Again, he had not declared war outright — but this was tantamount to war. Liholiho sent forces under Kalanimoku to intercept Keaoua. Their forces met at Kuamo?o, just South of Keauhou Bay. Keaoua fought bravely, but was eventually killed by rife fire. His wife Manono, who had been fighting at her husband's side, begged for mercy but was shot down as well. The rest of Keaoua's army scattered and the victory for Liholiho was complete.
This was the only armed rebellion in favor of the old religion.

The gymnasium at Old Kona Airport State Recreation Area is named in his honor.

*** References ***
Daws, Gavan, Shoal of Time: A History of the Hawaiian Islands, University of Hawaii Press, 1967
Kamakau, Samuel M., Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii, Kamehameha Schools Press, 1961 (a collection of newspaper articles written by Kamakau, in Hawaiian, during the 1800s)
Hiram Bingham I, A Residence of Twenty-one Years in the Sandwich Islands, Sherman Converse, New York, 1848 
KEKUAOKALANI (KEKUAOKALANI I, KAIWI-KUAMO?O KEKUA-O-KALANI) (I42113)
 
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FULL NAME: Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu

Kalanikauiokikilo is a person who, like her ancestor, Kalanikauleleaiwi (Queen of Hawa'i Island), appears at several locations as an ancestor in the Kekoolani family tree. She is a multiple ancestor. Therefore, her "mana" is believed to be very strong in the Kekoolani & Peleioholani family bloodline.

In the genealogies, these are her various names:

- Kalaniakua
- Kekumano (Fornander)
- Kekukamano
- Kalanikauiokekilo
- Kalanikikilo
- Kalanikekilo
- Kikilo
- Kekilo
- Kahakui
- Kalani Kaumehameha
- Kaumehameha
- Kamehameha-wahine
- Kalani-Kauko'oluaole

It is said that she committed suicide, rather than marry King Kamehameha the Great.

She was an extremely sacred kapu high chiefess of Maui. The "pio" daughter of Kamehamehanui (Ruler of Maui) and his royal sister Kalolo (who was also married into and became the mother of the Hawai'i Island royal family). She married her own father, producing a son (Kalaniulumoku I). She then married that son, producing three healthy son/grandsons. One of these, Kalanihelemaiiluna, was the grandfather of Pauahi (Bernice Bishop).

CHILDREN OF KEKAULIKE & KEKUAPOIWA NUI

From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):

"Keiki 1 - Kamehamehanui (k), King of Maui
Keiki 2 - Kalola (w)
Keiki 3 - Kuhooheiheipahu (w)
Keiki 4 - Kahekili (k), King of Maui

Look at Kamehameha nui (k) and Kalola (w); they are the own parents of Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu (w), the chiefess of Maui whose head is held high in the daytime."

[She was ninaupi'o chiefess, the hjighest possible rank of chief, because her parents were full blooded brother and sisters, the father being a ruling chief and himself a niau pi'o son. There was a famous taboo, named after this chiefess (see #6 below).]

"That is for us to stand in the midday sun when you can speak with a sharp tongue about the descendants of Kaikilanialiiwahineopuna and Kaukalihoano the third standard bearer of Kahoalii, and therefore, we have taken up our banner and kapu stick [insignia]. The islands have been won by us-Hawaii, Maui, Molokai, Oahu, Kauai, and the islands have been united for us; no island remains, not even the kapus. Here are the kapus:
1. He-iki-holu no Pakaalana
2. He-iki-alealea no Haleakeawe
3. He-iki-pua aholehole no Hikiau
4. He-opeope kau i kahi e
5. He kukuia i ke awakea
6. He poohoolewaikala oia o Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu (w)
7. He-ahi-ka mea e manalo ai. "

- Dean P. Kekoolani (January 24, 2010)
Kapolei, Oahu, Hawaii

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Ka Makaainana (newspaper) JULY 27, 1896 "Mookuauhau Ali'i: Na Iwikuamoo o Hawaii Nei Mai Kahiki Mai":
In this newspaper article we see the difficult to understand alternate name of "Kahakui".
Also, her son Kalaniulumoku iI s called simply "Kalani".
Her son Kalaniulumoku II is also known as the High Chief "Namaile" or "Kamaile".

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SHE IS HIGH CHIEFESS "KALANI KAUMEHAMEHA"

In the following genealogy of Kahikikala, she is called "Kalani Kaumehameha".

Mother: Kalani Kaumehameha
Father: Kalahumoku (Kalahumoku II, Kalahuimoku I)
Child: Kahikikala (Ruling Chiefess of Hana, Kipahulu and Kaupo)

High Chief Keoua Kalanikupuapa-i-nui sought this chiefess Kahikikila (daughter of Kaumehameha or Kalanikauiokikilo) for a wife because of her high rank and sacred kapus, which he hoped to acquire for his own offspring.

FROM History of Keoua Kalanikupuapa-i-nui (By Elizabeth Kekaaniauokalani Kalaninuiohilaukapu Pratt):

"Comely of person and gracious to all he met, Keoua as he verged toward manhood became an attractive personage. While yet awaiting the fulfilment of the plighted troth of his childhood, rumors of events in Maui royal circles were wafted across the waters of Alenuihaha channel which stirred his ambition. They were of the two beautiful daughters of Kalahumoku and his wife Kalani Kaumehameha. Kalahumoku was the reigning high chief of all Hana including also the districts of Kipahulu and Kaupo, whose decease had just taken place, his eldest daughter Kahikikala assuming the right of successorship in governing his people. Kalahumoku was a lineal descendant of Loe, the great progenitor of Maui's chiefdom, the Piilanis, Kamalalawalu and others, and of the Hana aliis as well.

This family possessed a wonderful tabu entirely different from, and never known to exist among, any of the other chief families of the Hawaiian group. It was styled "Ka Poo hoolewa i ka La," and inherited from Kaakaualaninui, the grandmother of Kalahumoku. It signified the laying of the head toward the sun's position in the heavens from its rising unto its setting. Days for the observance of this tabu were strictly kept. The only time for recreation during the tabu must be taken from between the setting of the luminary and the dawn of a new day."

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About the kapu which is properly titled "He poohoolewaikala oia o Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu"
(An explaination by Dean Kekoolani)

The kapu "Ka Poo hoolewa i ka La" mentioned in the above story which is said to have belonged to the chiefess Kahikikala was inherited from the mother's side, the side of chiefess Kalani Kaumehameha, who was also known as Kalanikuaiokikilo. It was not inherited from the father's side, the father's grandmother Kaakaualaninui, as was taught by the knowledgeable chiefess Elizabeth Kekaaniauokalani Kalaninuiohilaukapu Pratt. She is rarely wrong, but in this case we must differ with her. Her book on her chiefly and famous ancestor Keoua Kalanikupuapa-i-nui is quite excellent. She was also a very good friend and relative of this genealogist's great-grandfather Solomon Peleioholani. But the Chiefess Kekaaniauokalani's teaching on this matter is not correct.

Although the woman Kaakaualaninui was a highly tabued and sacred chiefess of Koolau, O'ahu being a Kumuhonua chiefess of impeccable pedogree, with exceptionally high rank by any island's standards, the kapu "Ka Poo hoolewa i ka La" was not hers. that kapu comes from only one possible place. It came directly from the the Kahihikala's mother Kalani Kaumehameha, who we understand to be the chiefess also named Kalanikauiokikilo . That very special tabu is associated specifically with her, it requires that the sun must always be kept at a certain angle to her head.

Kalanikauiokikilo was reknown for this very unique kapu. We are taught by the High Chief and genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheuila Peleioholani that the proper title for this exceptionally rare and formidable kapu belonging only to the Kalaniakua Kalanikauioiokiilo is "He poohoolewaikala oia o Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu". This kapu was a one of the coveted kapus of the kingdom of the islands, won by conquest and also legally inherited by bloodright, obtained by the Kamehamehas and their chiefs. Here are the other kapus of the Hawaiian Kingdom:

* "He-iki-holu Paakalana"
* "He-iki-alealea no Haleakeawe"
* "He-iki-pua aholehole no Hikiau"
* "He-opeope kau i kahi e"
* "He kukuia i ke awakea"
* "He-ahi-ka mea e manalo ai"

The fact that Kalani Kaumehameha was another name for Kalnikuiokikilo is further verified by the genealogy of the Kuikahi Family of Waipio Valley, Ka'u and Kohala. The Kuikahi family genealogy seerts firmly that Kalani Kaumenameha was the pi'o daughter of Kamenamenanui and his sister Kalola. There was only one such daughter ever from that sacred chiefly union, which was the exalted ninaupio chiefess Kalanikauiokikilo, who because of her exceedingly high rank and status (she was kalani-akua, a"living god", in flesh among humans) she had many many names and was known by many names all over the islands: on Maui, O'ahu, Hawaii, Moloka'i, Lanai and Kauai. .We now know understand that Kalanikauiokikilo also known as Kalani Kaumehameha, being she she was the daughter of King Kamehmehanui Ailua of Maui.

Finally, please not that there are no contradictory genealogies to this story of Kalani Kaumehameha. So it is should be resolved and accepted by all who understand.

- Dean Kekoolani
February 2, 2010
Ewa-a-Laakona, O'ahu, Hawaii

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Haleki'i and Pihana Heiau
By Lyons Kapi'ioho Naone III
(EXCERPT)

It is believed that in 1790 Kamehameha I invoked his war god at Pihana after his defeat of Kalanikupuli's forces in Iao Valley(serum 1909:46). After this battle, Kamehameha sent for the Maui chiefess Kalani-Kauko'oluaole, a daughter of Kamehameha Nui, whom he believed had insulted him at Kaupo. Poloahilani, foster-sister of Kalani-Kauko'oluaole, was sent instead and sacrificed by Karnehameha at Pihana. She was the last sacrifice at Pihana.

Born at Pihana was Keopuolani, a chiefess of divine rank and descendant of the ruling chiefs of Maui and Hawaii. She became the wife of Kamehameha I and mother of Liholiho (Kamehameha II) and Kauikeaouli (Kamehameha III).

Pihana was demolished by Kalanimakamauali'i and Kauanaulu during Ka'ahumanu's proclamation in 1819 (Stokes, 1916)

The Wailuku area was a major gathering place and residential site of the Maui high chiefs and those of rank. The area from Waihe'e to Wailuku was the largest continuous area of wet taro cultivation in the Hawaiian Islands (Handy and Handy, 1972:496). To the southeast of Iao Stream, below Pihana Heiau, was Kauahea where warriors dwelt and were trained in war skills. This was a boxing site in the time of Kahekili.

------------------------------------------

FORANDER "AN ACCOUNT..." p338

We learn from Vancouver that at this time Kaheiheimalie, afterwards known as Hoapiliwahine, a younger sister of Kaahumanu, was still the wife of Kamehameha's brother, Kalaimamahu. Vancouver also mentions "a captive daughter of Kahekili," who was then residing at Kamehameha's court. The person referred to was either one of Kahekili's nieces and his sister Kalola's daughters, Kalaniakua or Liliha Kekuiapoiwa, or else Kalola's granddaughter, Keopuolani, which three ladies were brought from Molokai to Hawaii by Kamehameha after the death of Kalola, as related on page 238.

(NOTE: The captive chiefess is Kalanikauiokikilo, who refused to marry Kamehameha, escaped a death sentence, but remained trapped at his court as a VIP captive. She escaped by committing suicide. - DEAN KEKOOLANI) 
KALANIKAUIOKIKILO (KALANI KAUMEHAMEHA, KALANIAKUA, KEKUMANO, KIKILO, KEKILO), (Maui Chiefess, Ninaupi'o) (Maui Chiefess, Ninaupi'o) (I40798)
 
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His marriages include a union with his own mother Kahikikalakalanilehua (Kalanilehua, Kahikikala), the Ruling Chiefess of Hana, Kipahulu and Kaupo. This mother-son naha pio or "ho'i" union was meant to increase the rank of his offspring, the chief Kukahikapaua.

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SHORT BIOGRAPHY

Kalokuokamaile (meaning "downpour/blowing of the maile" in Hawaiian), was a Hawaiian chief and first-born son of Keoua Kalanikupuapaikalaninui and half-brother of Kamehameha the Great who unified the Hawaiian Islands in 1810.

He was born on the island of Maui. His mother was the the High Chiefess Kahikikalaokalani ruler of Hana, Kipahulu and Kaupo. He was Keoua's firstborn son and was deemed "Ka Keiki o Kona wa Heuole," which means the offspring of his beardless youth. At age three his father return to his ancestral home on the Big Island of Hawaii and left Kalokuokamaile to be raised by his mother.."

Years passed and he grew up to be a strong athletic man, of good and mild nature, with no selfish or ambitious motives. His single aim was to secure the happiness and contentment of his people. His mother had died and now he was the ruler of the kingdom in her stead.

He had taken a wife from the neighboring district of Kahikinui and Honuaula, ruled over by a chiefly family of which Kaloiokalani was the only flower. Tiding of her fine qualities had reached Hana. He set out to visit that court and he had to observe th kapu of his family, paying his visits by night. He was happily received by the parents and soon arrangements for the royal nupitals were completed. When the hoao (wedding) had taken place and feasting and dancing ended, Kalokuokamaile made preparations to return to Hana. As Kaloiokalani was a great favorite with her people, the makaaina volunteered to get up a great cavalcade to escort the distinguished couple as far as Kipahulu District. It was said in legends that, so immense was the throng, the procession was mistaken for an invasion by some unknown enemy. However Kalokuokamaile was at last settled at the old family homestead and affairs ran smoothly and lovely.

A bright little girl soon appeared on the scene. They named her Kaohelelani, and she was fated to be their only child. She was verging into maidenhood when he died. His people showed their affectionate regard for him by making his grave on the highest peak of their country, Kauwiki. Upon news of his death reaching his brother Kamehameha I, he decided to take his fatherless niece into his court and for their brother Kealiimaikai to temporalily hold Kaohelelani's land inheritances until she reach majority. Kamehameha conquered Kalanikupule, King of Maui, and partition out, to the chiefs who had aided him, the land that was the rightful ingeritance of his niece.
[edit]References

REF:
(1) Pratt, Elizabeth K. (March 27, 2000). Keoua : Father of Kings . Ke Ali'i Pub. Page 15-17
(2) Pratt, Elizabeth K. (March 27, 2000). Keoua : Father of Kings . Ke Ali'i Pub. Page 43-44 
KALOKUOKAMAILE (KA-LOKU-O-KAMAILE), (Ali'i-o-Hana, Ali'i-o-Kipahulu, Ali'i-o-Kaupo) (Ali'i-o-Hana, Ali'i-o-Kipahulu, A (I40875)
 
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Some genealogies skip the generation of Wakalana (k.) & Kauai (w.) and have Alo descending directly from Lonomai. We follow Kamakau, who does not skip that generation.

- DEAN KEKOOLANI
Jan 28, 2010

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ALTERNATE PARENTAL PAIRING: WAKALANA (k.) & NELEIKI (w.)

Neleiki was a foriegn woman, possibly a European, who may have arrived in Hawaii long before James Cook.

FROM FORNANDER:
Tradition records that a vessel called " Mamala" arrived at Wailuku [Maui]. The captain's name is said to have been Kaluiki-a-Manu, and the names of the other people on board are given in the tradition as Neleike, Malaea, Haakoa, and Hika. These latter comprised both men and women, and it is said that Neleike became the wife of Wakalana and the mother of his son Alo-o-ia, and that they became the' progenitors of a light-coloured family, "poe ohana Kekea," and that they were white people, with bright, shining eyes, "Kanaka Keokeo a ua alohilohi na mka." The tradition further states that their descendants were plentiful in or about Waimalo and Honouliuli on Oahu, and that their appearance and countenances changed by intermarriage with the Hawaiian people. ("An Account of the Polynesia People")

FROM KAMAKAU:
Here are some of the first haole to come to Hawai’i nei. They arrived during the time of Wakalana the chief of Maui and his wife Kaua’i. Some people say that it was during the time of Kaka’alaneo that these people arrived, while others say that it was Kukanaloa who arrived during the time of Kaka’alaneo. The ship came to Wailuku, Maui; it was the Mamala; the captain was Kuluikia-Manu, and on board were Masawell, Neleiki, Malaea, Ha’akoa, and Hika- some were men and some were women. It is said by some that Neleiki mated with Wakalana and that their child was Alo’oia, who became the chief after Wakalana; others say that Alo’oia was Kaua’i’s child. This was before the year AD. 900. They were perhaps the ancestors of the albino people, "kapo’e kekea". There are many of these people at Wai-mánalo in Honouliuli [Honolulu], O’ahu. Their features are different from other Hawaiians. ("Ka Moolelo o Kamehameha I")

FROM DEAN KEKOOLANI (January 2010):
According to the genealogies, Alo’oia is my 32nd great-grandfather. At 20 years a generation, the arrival of the foreign woman Neleike could have been in the 1400's as opposed to the 900's as calculated by Kamakau. This would make a European ship arrival in the Hawaiian Islands a possibility long before James Cook. Most people thinking aboutn this story have come up with theory that this was a vessel from China, perhaps blown off course in a storm. But the names do not make sense for that story. It is easier to believe that the boat was perhaps of Spanish or Dutch origin, having arrived in the Pacific via the European-Asian trading routes in the Indian Ocean (through Southeast Asia and up north through the South Pacific to Hawaii). The names could clearly be European: Masawell (Maxwell), Neleiki (Elizabeth, Nellie), Malaea (Maria). 
ALO (ALO-O-IA) (I40646)
 
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Liliha Kekuipoiwa (Kekuipoiwa III) is the daughter of Kalaniopu'u, not Keaoua Kalanikupuapa'ikalaninui (Keaoua) as commonly taught.

Knowing the true father of Liliha Kekuipoiwa means we can now see that when she married Kiwalao, she was marrying her full brother not her half-brother, as is commonly taught. This their offspring Keopuolani (w.), a full Ninau Pi'o chief, because she is the offspring of a full blooded brother and sister who are themselves the children of ruling chiefs. This is a rare and precious type chief.

Liliha's daughter Keopuolani, would have been considered more than a normal human being: she was a living god walking among mortals (an "akua"). Thus we understand why she was sought after by Kamehameha to be the Royal Queen Mother of his sons, the furture kings (Kamehameha II and Kamehameha III)

The only person of equal rank to Liliha Kekuipoiwa's daughter would have been the Ninau Pio chiefess Kalanikauiokikilo of Maui, a half-sister of Liliha Kekuipoiwa. Kamehameha also sought this chiefess Kalanikauiokikilo as a wife but because of her high station she committed suicide rather than surrender to Kamehameha, who she considered an enemy of Maui (which he had conquered and subdued) and of insufficient chiefly rank to be her mate.

(Kalanikauikikilo was wrong abou Kamehameha's rank, please see his records and the information about his true parent in this database for that separate discussion)

* PLEASE NOTE: Further sanctifying the daughter Keopuolani was the fact that Liliha and Kiwalao's mother Kalola was herself a kind of Pi'o chief, being the product of a marriage between King Kekaulike of Maui and his half-sister Kekuipoiwa Nui.

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LILIHA KEKUIPOIWA: DAUGHTER OF KING KALANIOPU'U
"The Complete Ancestry of John Liwai Kalniopuuikapali-o-Molilele-ma-wai-o-Ahukini-Kau-Hawaii Ena"
(S.L.K. Peleioholani)
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HAWAIIAN:
Kalaniopuu (k), moi, hoao ia Kalola (w), alii kiekie o Maui, hanau o Kiwalao (k) Liliha Kekuiapoiwa (w), a noho moi mahope mai.

ENGLISH:
Kalaniopuu (k), king, married to Kalola (w), high chiefess of Maui; born was Kiwalao (k) Liliha Kekuiapoiwa (w), who later became ruling king.


[And, later in the same genealogy article (below) - D. Kekoolani]


HAWAIIAN:
E nana ia Kalaninuiiamamao (k) oia ponoi ka makua o Moi Kalaniopuu (k) ame kana mau keiki.
(I) Keiki hiapo Kiwalao (k);
(II) Keiki elua Liliha Kekuiapoiwa, o Saua ponoi ke kupuna o Liholiho (k) I, moi o Hawaii, kupuna o Naahienaena (w)/ kupuna o Kauikeaouli (k) moi o Hawaii.
(III). Kalaniopuu (k) ka makuakane ponoi o Kaleipaihala (k)/ ke kupuna ponoi o Kaleleonalani moi a me L. M. Kekupuoh, Keawehawaii (k), Halalo (k), J. Ropikana (k).
(IV) Kalaniopuu (k) ka makuakane o Keaouakuahuula, ke kupuna o na lit Kekaaniau (w) Honolulu, L. M. Kekupuohi, Sam Paka.

ENGLISH:
Look at Kalaninuiiamamao (k); he was the own father of King Kalaniopuu (k) and his children.
(I) The eldest son Kiwalao (k);
(II) Second child Liliha Kekuiapoiwa; they are the true grandparents of Lihoiiho I (k), King of Hawaii, grandparent of Naahienaena (w) and grandparent of Kauikeaouli (k) King of Hawaii.
(III). Kalaniopuu (k)/ the true father of Kaleipaihala (k), the grandfather of Kaleleonalani, Queen, and L. M. Kekupuohi, Keawehawaii (k), Halalo (k), and J. Robinson (k).
(IV) Kalaniopuu (k), the father of Keaouakuahuula, the ancestor of the chiefess Kekaaniau (w) of Honolulu, L. M. Kekupuohi and Sam Parker. The chief Keouakuahuula (k), true ancestor through the mother of Keouakuahuula, namely Kanekapolei (w), of W. Notley, C. K. Notley, K. 0. Notley, M. Notley, all of Waimea, Hawaii.

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CONCLUSION

Textbooks, charts and references should be corrected.

This is the correct genealogy of the Kamehameha Dynasty according to my great grandfather High Chief S.L.K. Peleiholani, senior ranking Chief of the Keawe Lineage of Hawaii along with his sister the Honorable Ululani Liwai (Baker), Governess of Hawaii Island, advisor to the kings Kamehameha IV and Kalakaua.

This is the knowledge handed down by the Maui and Hawaii chiefs who fathered Kamehameha, helped him conquer the islands, or resisted him to defend their own kingship when they could, and finally gave up their women to be his royal wives. These foundational chiefs passed the kokua and the mo'okuauhau in an unbroken chain from father to son, mother to son, directly to S.L.K. Peleioholani, whose grandmother Kahahana sat at Kamehameha the Great's bedside as he was dieing.

- Dean P. Kekoolani
January 23, 2010
Kapolei, Oahu, Hawaii 
KEKUIAPOIWA (KEKUIAPOIWA III), Liliha (I40868)
 
89 , province de Namur GODIN, Maurice cavalier de Givet (I5031)
 
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OLOLO GENEALOGY
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There are many versions of the genealogies coming before the chief WAKEA and his wife PAPA. These genealogies are different from tradition to tradition, island to island. They are occasionally not in agreement and each island boasted that their very ancient genealogies before WAKEA and PAPA were correct and superior. This is a generation from genealogy called "OLOLO". It is a genealogy of the chiefs of Hawai'i Island (Big Island) and Maui.

The OLOLO begins with KUMUHONUA (k.) & HALOIHO (w.) and is 21 generations long, leading up to WAKEA and PAPA.

This is OLOLO genealogy generation No. 10.

Each generation is computed at 22 years.

- Dean P. Kekoolani, Editor 
KAHIKOLEIHONUA (I40367)
 
91 --------------------------------
OLOLO GENEALOGY
-------------------------------
There are many versions of the genealogies coming before the chief WAKEA and his wife PAPA. These genealogies are different from tradition to tradition, island to island. They are occasionally not in agreement and each island boasted that their very ancient genealogies before WAKEA and PAPA were correct and superior. This is a generation from genealogy called "OLOLO". It is a genealogy of the chiefs of Hawai'i Island (Big Island) and Maui.

The OLOLO begins with KUMUHONUA (k.) & HALOIHO (w.) and is 21 generations long, leading up to WAKEA and PAPA.

This is OLOLO genealogy generation No. 11.

Each generation is computed at 22 years.

- Dean P. Kekoolani, Editor 
HAAKOAKOALAULANI (I40368)
 
92 --------------------------------
OLOLO GENEALOGY
-------------------------------
There are many versions of the genealogies coming before the chief WAKEA and his wife PAPA. These genealogies are different from tradition to tradition, island to island. They are occasionally not in agreement and each island boasted that their very ancient genealogies before WAKEA and PAPA were correct and superior. This is a generation from genealogy called "OLOLO". It is a genealogy of the chiefs of Hawai'i Island (Big Island) and Maui.

The OLOLO begins with KUMUHONUA (k.) & HALOIHO (w.) and is 21 generations long, leading up to WAKEA and PAPA.

This is OLOLO genealogy generation No. 12.

Each generation is computed at 22 years.

- Dean P. Kekoolani, Editor 
KUPO (I40369)
 
93 --------------------------------
OLOLO GENEALOGY
-------------------------------
There are many versions of the genealogies coming before the chief WAKEA and his wife PAPA. These genealogies are different from tradition to tradition, island to island. They are occasionally not in agreement and each island boasted that their very ancient genealogies before WAKEA and PAPA were correct and superior. This is a generation from genealogy called "OLOLO". It is a genealogy of the chiefs of Hawai'i Island (Big Island) and Maui.

The OLOLO begins with KUMUHONUA (k.) & HALOIHO (w.) and is 21 generations long, leading up to WAKEA and PAPA.

This is OLOLO genealogy generation No. 13.

Each generation is computed at 22 years.

- Dean P. Kekoolani, Editor 
NAHAEIKEKUA (I40370)
 
94 --------------------------------
OLOLO GENEALOGY
-------------------------------
There are many versions of the genealogies coming before the chief WAKEA and his wife PAPA. These genealogies are different from tradition to tradition, island to island. They are occasionally not in agreement and each island boasted that their very ancient genealogies before WAKEA and PAPA were correct and superior. This is a generation from genealogy called "OLOLO". It is a genealogy of the chiefs of Hawai'i Island (Big Island) and Maui.

The OLOLO begins with KUMUHONUA (k.) & HALOIHO (w.) and is 21 generations long, leading up to WAKEA and PAPA.

This is OLOLO genealogy generation No. 14.

Each generation is computed at 22 years.

- Dean P. Kekoolani, Editor 
KEAKENUI (I40371)
 
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OLOLO GENEALOGY
-------------------------------
There are many versions of the genealogies coming before the chief WAKEA and his wife PAPA. These genealogies are different from tradition to tradition, island to island. They are occasionally not in agreement and each island boasted that their very ancient genealogies before WAKEA and PAPA were correct and superior. This is a generation from genealogy called "OLOLO". It is a genealogy of the chiefs of Hawai'i Island (Big Island) and Maui.

The OLOLO begins with KUMUHONUA (k.) & HALOIHO (w.) and is 21 generations long, leading up to WAKEA and PAPA.

This is OLOLO genealogy generation No. 15.

Each generation is computed at 22 years.

- Dean P. Kekoolani, Editor 
KAHIANAHINAKII-AKEA (I40372)
 
96 --------------------------------
OLOLO GENEALOGY
-------------------------------
There are many versions of the genealogies coming before the chief WAKEA and his wife PAPA. These genealogies are different from tradition to tradition, island to island. They are occasionally not in agreement and each island boasted that their very ancient genealogies before WAKEA and PAPA were correct and superior. This is a generation from genealogy called "OLOLO". It is a genealogy of the chiefs of Hawai'i Island (Big Island) and Maui.

The OLOLO begins with KUMUHONUA (k.) & HALOIHO (w.) and is 21 generations long, leading up to WAKEA and PAPA.

This is OLOLO genealogy generation No. 16.

Each generation is computed at 22 years.

- Dean P. Kekoolani, Editor 
KOLUANAHINAKII (I40373)
 
97 --------------------------------
OLOLO GENEALOGY
-------------------------------
There are many versions of the genealogies coming before the chief WAKEA and his wife PAPA. These genealogies are different from tradition to tradition, island to island. They are occasionally not in agreement and each island boasted that their very ancient genealogies before WAKEA and PAPA were correct and superior. This is a generation from genealogy called "OLOLO". It is a genealogy of the chiefs of Hawai'i Island (Big Island) and Maui.

The OLOLO begins with KUMUHONUA (k.) & HALOIHO (w.) and is 21 generations long, leading up to WAKEA and PAPA.

This is OLOLO genealogy generation No. 17.

Each generation is computed at 22 years.

- Dean P. Kekoolani, Editor 
LIMANAHINAKII (I40374)
 
98 --------------------------------
OLOLO GENEALOGY
-------------------------------
There are many versions of the genealogies coming before the chief WAKEA and his wife PAPA. These genealogies are different from tradition to tradition, island to island. They are occasionally not in agreement and each island boasted that their very ancient genealogies before WAKEA and PAPA were correct and superior. This is a generation from genealogy called "OLOLO". It is a genealogy of the chiefs of Hawai'i Island (Big Island) and Maui.

The OLOLO begins with KUMUHONUA (k.) & HALOIHO (w.) and is 21 generations long, leading up to WAKEA and PAPA.

This is OLOLO genealogy generation No. 18.

Each generation is computed at 22 years.

- Dean P. Kekoolani, Editor 
HIKIUANAHINA (I40375)
 
99 --------------------------------
OLOLO GENEALOGY
-------------------------------
There are many versions of the genealogies coming before the chief WAKEA and his wife PAPA. These genealogies are different from tradition to tradition, island to island. They are occasionally not in agreement and each island boasted that their very ancient genealogies before WAKEA and PAPA were correct and superior. This is a generation from genealogy called "OLOLO". It is a genealogy of the chiefs of Hawai'i Island (Big Island) and Maui.

The OLOLO begins with KUMUHONUA (k.) & HALOIHO (w.) and is 21 generations long, leading up to WAKEA and PAPA.

This is OLOLO genealogy generation No. 19.

Each generation is computed at 22 years.

- Dean P. Kekoolani, Editor 
IWAHINAKIIAKEA (IWAHINA) (I40376)
 
100 --------------------------------
OLOLO GENEALOGY
-------------------------------
There are many versions of the genealogies coming before the chief WAKEA and his wife PAPA. These genealogies are different from tradition to tradition, island to island. They are occasionally not in agreement and each island boasted that their very ancient genealogies before WAKEA and PAPA were correct and superior. This is a generation from genealogy called "OLOLO". It is a genealogy of the chiefs of Hawai'i Island (Big Island) and Maui.

The OLOLO begins with KUMUHONUA (k.) & HALOIHO (w.) and is 21 generations long, leading up to WAKEA and PAPA.

This is OLOLO genealogy generation No. 2.

Each generation is computed at 22 years.

- Dean P. Kekoolani, Editor 
KUMUHONUA (KUMUHONUA-A-PALIPALIHIA) (I40359)
 
101 --------------------------------
OLOLO GENEALOGY
-------------------------------
There are many versions of the genealogies coming before the chief WAKEA and his wife PAPA. These genealogies are different from tradition to tradition, island to island. They are occasionally not in agreement and each island boasted that their very ancient genealogies before WAKEA and PAPA were correct and superior. This is a generation from genealogy called "OLOLO". It is a genealogy of the chiefs of Hawai'i Island (Big Island) and Maui.

The OLOLO begins with KUMUHONUA (k.) & HALOIHO (w.) and is 21 generations long, leading up to WAKEA and PAPA.

This is OLOLO genealogy generation No. 20.

Each generation is computed at 22 years.

- Dean P. Kekoolani, Editor 
WELAAHILANINUI (IWAHINA) (I40377)
 
102 --------------------------------
OLOLO GENEALOGY
-------------------------------
There are many versions of the genealogies coming before the chief WAKEA and his wife PAPA. These genealogies are different from tradition to tradition, island to island. They are occasionally not in agreement and each island boasted that their very ancient genealogies before WAKEA and PAPA were correct and superior. This is a generation from genealogy called "OLOLO". It is a genealogy of the chiefs of Hawai'i Island (Big Island) and Maui.

The OLOLO begins with KUMUHONUA (k.) & HALOIHO (w.) and is 21 generations long, leading up to WAKEA and PAPA.

This is OLOLO genealogy generation No. 21.

Each generation is computed at 22 years.

- Dean P. Kekoolani, Editor 
KAHIKO LAUMEA (I), (Kahiko) (Kahiko) (I40378)
 
103 --------------------------------
OLOLO GENEALOGY
-------------------------------
There are many versions of the genealogies coming before the chief WAKEA and his wife PAPA. These genealogies are different from tradition to tradition, island to island. They are occasionally not in agreement and each island boasted that their very ancient genealogies before WAKEA and PAPA were correct and superior. This is a generation from genealogy called "OLOLO". It is a genealogy of the chiefs of Hawai'i Island (Big Island) and Maui.

The OLOLO begins with KUMUHONUA (k.) & HALOIHO (w.) and is 21 generations long, leading up to WAKEA and PAPA.

This is OLOLO genealogy generation No. 3.

Each generation is computed at 22 years.

- Dean P. Kekoolani, Editor 
AHUKAI (AHUKAI I, AHUKAI-O-KUMUHONUA) (I40360)
 
104 --------------------------------
OLOLO GENEALOGY
-------------------------------
There are many versions of the genealogies coming before the chief WAKEA and his wife PAPA. These genealogies are different from tradition to tradition, island to island. They are occasionally not in agreement and each island boasted that their very ancient genealogies before WAKEA and PAPA were correct and superior. This is a generation from genealogy called "OLOLO". It is a genealogy of the chiefs of Hawai'i Island (Big Island) and Maui.

The OLOLO begins with KUMUHONUA (k.) & HALOIHO (w.) and is 21 generations long, leading up to WAKEA and PAPA.

This is OLOLO genealogy generation No. 4.

Each generation is computed at 22 years.

- Dean P. Kekoolani, Editor 
KAPILI (I40361)
 
105 --------------------------------
OLOLO GENEALOGY
-------------------------------
There are many versions of the genealogies coming before the chief WAKEA and his wife PAPA. These genealogies are different from tradition to tradition, island to island. They are occasionally not in agreement and each island boasted that their very ancient genealogies before WAKEA and PAPA were correct and superior. This is a generation from genealogy called "OLOLO". It is a genealogy of the chiefs of Hawai'i Island (Big Island) and Maui.

The OLOLO begins with KUMUHONUA (k.) & HALOIHO (w.) and is 21 generations long, leading up to WAKEA and PAPA.

This is OLOLO genealogy generation No. 5.

Each generation is computed at 22 years.

- Dean P. Kekoolani, Editor 
KAWAKUPUA (I40362)
 
106 --------------------------------
OLOLO GENEALOGY
-------------------------------
There are many versions of the genealogies coming before the chief WAKEA and his wife PAPA. These genealogies are different from tradition to tradition, island to island. They are occasionally not in agreement and each island boasted that their very ancient genealogies before WAKEA and PAPA were correct and superior. This is a generation from genealogy called "OLOLO". It is a genealogy of the chiefs of Hawai'i Island (Big Island) and Maui.

The OLOLO begins with KUMUHONUA (k.) & HALOIHO (w.) and is 21 generations long, leading up to WAKEA and PAPA.

This is OLOLO genealogy generation No. 6.

Each generation is computed at 22 years.

- Dean P. Kekoolani, Editor 
KAWAKAHIKO (I40363)
 
107 --------------------------------
OLOLO GENEALOGY
-------------------------------
There are many versions of the genealogies coming before the chief WAKEA and his wife PAPA. These genealogies are different from tradition to tradition, island to island. They are occasionally not in agreement and each island boasted that their very ancient genealogies before WAKEA and PAPA were correct and superior. This is a generation from genealogy called "OLOLO". It is a genealogy of the chiefs of Hawai'i Island (Big Island) and Maui.

The OLOLO begins with KUMUHONUA (k.) & HALOIHO (w.) and is 21 generations long, leading up to WAKEA and PAPA.

This is OLOLO genealogy generation No. 7.

Each generation is computed at 22 years.

- Dean P. Kekoolani, Editor 
KAHIKOLUPA (I40364)
 
108 --------------------------------
OLOLO GENEALOGY
-------------------------------
There are many versions of the genealogies coming before the chief WAKEA and his wife PAPA. These genealogies are different from tradition to tradition, island to island. They are occasionally not in agreement and each island boasted that their very ancient genealogies before WAKEA and PAPA were correct and superior. This is a generation from genealogy called "OLOLO". It is a genealogy of the chiefs of Hawai'i Island (Big Island) and Maui.

The OLOLO begins with KUMUHONUA (k.) & HALOIHO (w.) and is 21 generations long, leading up to WAKEA and PAPA.

This is OLOLO genealogy generation No. 8.

Each generation is computed at 22 years.

- Dean P. Kekoolani, Editor 
KAHIKOLEIKAU (I40365)
 
109 --------------------------------
OLOLO GENEALOGY
-------------------------------
There are many versions of the genealogies coming before the chief WAKEA and his wife PAPA. These genealogies are different from tradition to tradition, island to island. They are occasionally not in agreement and each island boasted that their very ancient genealogies before WAKEA and PAPA were correct and superior. This is a generation from genealogy called "OLOLO". It is a genealogy of the chiefs of Hawai'i Island (Big Island) and Maui.

The OLOLO begins with KUMUHONUA (k.) & HALOIHO (w.) and is 21 generations long, leading up to WAKEA and PAPA.

This is OLOLO genealogy generation No. 9.

Each generation is computed at 22 years.

- Dean P. Kekoolani, Editor 
KAHIKOLEIULU (I40366)
 
110 ---------------------------------------------------

EXCERPT FROM 1919 NEWSPAPER ARTICLE (NOT COMPLETE):

KA NUPEPA KUOKOA November 21, 1919
HALA IA PUA ALII KAMEHAMEHA This Kamehameha Chiefly Offspring Is Gone(Moses Keaulana)

Moses Keaulana was born in Koleaka, Honolulu, in 1876; he had reached the age of 43 and more. Here is his genealogy. Kamehameha the Conqueror is the one who married Kauhilanimaka and was born Kahiwa Kanekapolei**. Kauhilanimaka (w.), she is the true sister-in-law of Kanekapolei I, wife of Kamehameha I, with her brother, that is Kalamakuikeao, second husband of Kauhilanimaka and thus was this daughter called by the name Kanekapolei.

Kahiwa Kanekapolei married Kahaaualani and was born Kalamakuikeao Kaahiki.

** Kahiwa Kanekapolei is also the mother of Kepelino, the writer. 
KALAMAKUIKEAO (KALAMAKUIKEAO I) (I42963)
 
111 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

FORNANDER:
"Kalona-iki appears to have followed in the footsteps of his father, and observed the laws and policy inaugurated by him. The island was quiet and continued prosperous. No attacks from abroad, no convulsions within, have been remembered in the legends during his time. His wife was Kikinui-a-Ewa. Her parents are not mentioned, but it is said that she belonged to the great family of Ewauli-a-lakona, the great-grandson of Maweke. Kalona-iki's children, as known, were Piliwale, Lo-Lale, and Kamaleamaka. The first succeeded him as Moi, the second we have already referred to, and of the third nothing more is known." 
PILIWALE, (Chief of Kukaniloko, Lihue, Oahu, Ruing Chief of Ewa) (Chief of Kukaniloko, Lihue, Oahu, (I41638)
 
112 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

FROM
The Complete Ancestry of John Liwai Kalaniopuuikapali-o-MoliIele-ma-wai-o-Ahukini-Kau-Hawaii Ena:

2. Look at Kekaulike (k), page 4, no. 10.
3. Kekaulikeokalanikuihonoikamoku (k), King of Maui.

Here are the children:
1. Kauhiaimokuakama (k)
2. Kamehamehanui (k)
3. Kalola (w), mother of Kiwalao and Liliha
4. Kuhoohiehie (w)*
5. Kahekili (k)
6. Namahanaikaleleonalani (w)
7. Kekuamanoha (k)
8. Kekuapoiula (w)/ wife of King Kahahana
9. Kaeokulani (k), King of Kauai
10. Manuhaaipo (w), Queen of lao
11. Ahia
12. Nahulanui
[*Also spelled Kuhooheihei.] 
NAMAHANA (NAMAHANA-I-KALELEOKALANI, NAMAHANA-A-KEKAULIKE, NAMAHANA NUI) (I40842)
 
113 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

FROM
The Complete Ancestry of John Liwai Kalaniopuuikapali-o-MoliIele-ma-wai-o-Ahukini-Kau-Hawaii Ena:

2. Look at Kekaulike (k), page 4, no. 10.
3. Kekaulikeokalanikuihonoikamoku (k), King of Maui.

Here are the children:
1. Kauhiaimokuakama (k)
2. Kamehamehanui (k)
3. Kalola (w), mother of Kiwalao and Liliha
4. Kuhoohiehie (w)*
5. Kahekili (k)
6. Namahanaikaleleonalani (w)
7. Kekuamanoha (k)
8. Kekuapoiula (w)/ wife of King Kahahana
9. Kaeokulani (k), King of Kauai
10. Manuhaaipo (w), Queen of lao
11. Ahia
12. Nahulanui
[*Also spelled Kuhooheihei.] 
KA'EO-KULANI (KA'EO-KU-LANI), (King of Maui) (King of Maui) (I41209)
 
114 . She was killed by a drunk boater as she was taking a swim after theday's filming of the movie 'The Boy in Blue' - which is dedicated toher. HUGHES, Sara Helen Parry (I769)
 
115 1 man >50, 1 man 16-50, 1 woman. 1 Scotch, 1 Irish, 1 acadian O'BRIEN, Michael (I4590)
 
116 1 man >50, 1 woman , 4 boys, 3 girls = 9 total [1 Irish, 1 American, 7Acadians] 1838 2 men >14, 1 girl over 14; 50 acresclear, 50 acres wilderness (family #126) Notes in Ivan Randall's bibleabout Morgan's children (compare 1817 above): Mrs.Chisholm at Pond,Mrs.Leydon, Mrs.O'Brien, Richard, Donald, William, Thomas (Thomasidentifed as father of Mat and John) 1818 surveyor's map (see PaulRandall): Morgan Connors has a plot granted between Afton &Tracadie--other maps show this land granted to John Turpey. CONNORS, Morgan (I1063)
 
117 10 ans JEANNE, Andrée Angélique (I4967)
 
118 10 ans au rec. de 1681; 46 ans en 1716 LACASSE, Marie Françoise (I3382)
 
119 100 ans CADIEUX, Charles Sieur de Courville (I2131)
 
120 100 arpents achetées au prix de 2,880 livres. Ferme et métairie. Elleporte le nom depuis 1204 et tient son nom des macicots, c'est-à-direleschantres du clergé de Notre-Dame de paris. DE BAILLON, Sr de Valence et de la Mascotterie escuyer Alphonse (I3314)
 
121 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I854)
 
122 13/12 89000.Auxerre Il enleva sa femme avec l'appui du Pape. Family F3337
 
123 1337, in living 11th year of the reign of Edward III. COBB, Richard Esq. (I1959)
 
124 15 betes a cornes, 8 moutons, 12 cochons, 30 arpents en valeur. MORIN, Pierre dit Boucher (I1163)
 
125 15 betes a cornes, 8 moutons, 12 cochons, 30 arpents en valeur. MORIN, Pierre dit Boucher (I1163)
 
126 1871 census: Elisha W. (52 yrs.) lives with wife Ruth and 3 small girls,his widowed mother, and his cousin James Randall Cook. Elisha is a'storekeeper' and James (27 yrs.) is a 'store clerk.' They aredescribed as 'W. Methodist.' According to Martha Feltmate (of Bayfield,NS) Elisha W. had a shipyard; two of his ships were the EWR, and theNEVA (was originally supposed to be NOVA!). The old store (original?)was torn down in the 1970's. It was across the road from Elisha'shouse--one of the earliest and nicest of the old homes. RANDALL, Elisha William (I3891)
 
127 1er mariage célébré à N-D de Québec. Témoin: Samuel de Champlain Family F1379
 
128 22 ans en 1666 IVORY, Catherine (I3260)
 
129 22 ans en 1666. ISABELLE, Michel dit Le Grand (I2180)
 
130 23-09 ct. Duquet Family F1832
 
131 24 ans MINEAU, Gabrielle (I3117)
 
132 24 ans 1681 MINEAU, Gabrielle (I3117)
 
133 25 ans en '66 et 28 ans en '67, 40 ans en '81 VEAU, Sylvain (I3385)
 
134 25 ans en 1666 DIONNE, Antoine (I3259)
 
135 26 ans en 1681 HUBERT, Marie (I3174)
 
136 26 betes a cornes, 29 brebis, 12 chevres, 20 cochons, 6 arpents en valeur MIUS, Lieutenant-Major Philippe Sieur d'Entremont, Baron de de Pob (I4490)
 
137 26ans JEANNE, Andrée Angélique (I4967)
 
138 2ème épouse de Valentinien. Justina (I5466)
 
139 2ieme du nom. Parrain Jacques de Meule, Intendant de la Nouv-France(depassage) et Marie-Josephe Le Neuf de la Valliere, fille du Seigneur deBeaubassin. MORIN, Jacques dit Bonsecours (I1184)
 
140 2nd Earl of Huntingdon DE SAINT LIZ, Earl Simon , Of Huntingdon (I6804)
 
141 2Nd Earl of Surrey, Commander in KIng's Army; Knight DE WARRENNE, Earl William (I6878)
 
142 30 ans MARTIN, Andrée (I1173)
 
143 30 ans en 1667 VALLÉE, Pierre (I3377)
 
144 30 arpents en valeur PARÉ, Robert (I2279)
 
145 31 betes a cornes, 8 brebis, 27 cochons, 50 arpents en labour, 12 fusils Family F2512
 
146 32 ans GUENET, Pierre (I2061)
 
147 32 ans en 67 BRUNET, Françoise (I3408)
 
148 33 ans en '66 DUBÉ, Mathurin (I3876)
 
149 34 ans GODIN, Pierre dit Chatillon (I4984)
 
150 35 ans MARTIN, Marie-Madeleine (I1164)
 
151 35 ans en 1666 GAREMAN, Nicole (I4656)
 
152 36 ans en 1681 DE BAILLON, Catherine Marie (I3296)
 
153 36 ans, charpentier MÉNAGE, Pierre (I3232)
 
154 37 ans GUENET, Pierre (I2061)
 
155 3ème enfant. Profession : Comte de Salm et Co-Roi de Germanie en 1080. DE SALM, Hermann Ier (I6161)
 
156 3ème femme. DE HEIDMARK, Svanhild Oysteinsdotter (I5999)
 
157 40 ans LAMBERT, Eustache Sieur de Ste-Marie (I4647)
 
158 45 ans DOYON, Jean (I2153)
 
159 46-174 Kamehameha Hwy, Kaneohe Obituary ADAMS, Louisa Kekahilinaniopauahi (I40660)
 
160 50 arpents en valeur, 13 bestiaux. Family F1272
 
161 57 ans BRASSARD, Antoine (I2378)
 
162 58 ans BRASSARD, Antoine (I2378)
 
163 62 ans SAINT-DENIS, Pierre (I3616)
 
164 64 ans en 1697, 42 ans en 66 et 67, 60 ans en 81 CHAPELIER, Marie (I3398)
 
165 68 ans LUCAS, Jacqueline (I4563)
 
166 68 ans RATTÉ, Jacques (I3694)
 
167 68 ans DURAND, Jeanne (I3404)
 
168 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I1391)
 
169 6th child and 3rd son of David Atwater. [see Jost] One of the firstsettlers in Wallingford, Conn. according to Tag Duprey. (see note forhis father). Yet another note says he was called 'Weaver.' ATWATER, John (I1071)
 
170 7 bestiaux et 20 arpents en valeur PARÉ, Robert (I2279)
 
171 70 ans GUENEVILLE, Jeanne (I3763)
 
172 70 ans BLANCHARD, Gillette (I3540)
 
173 70 ans DURAND, Françoise (I2435)
 
174 70 ans BUTEAU, Pierre (I2407)
 
175 71 ans CARREAU, Louis d. Lafraicheur (I3549)
 
176 72 ans FAURE, Louise d. Planchet (I3108)
 
177 72 ans CARBONNEAU D. PROVENÇAL, Esprit (I2414)
 
178 72 arpents ( 1 arpent = 58,5 mètres) au prix de 40 livres. Sur la rivegauche du "premier détour" de la rivière Ouelle. Belle terre, riche etfertile, deux des cotés attenants a la rivière Ouelle. MIVILLE, Jacques d. Deschênes (I3297)
 
179 72 arpents ( 1 arpent = 58,5 mètres) au prix de 40 livres. Sur la rivegauche du "premier détour" de la rivière Ouelle. Belle terre, riche etfertile, deux des cotés attenants a la rivière Ouelle. DE BAILLON, Catherine Marie (I3296)
 
180 74 ans BOUFFART, Jacques (I3510)
 
181 74 ans LANGLOIS, Anne (I3194)
 
182 76 ans DUBÉ, Mathurin (I3876)
 
183 76 ans LORYOT, Pérette (I2410)
 
184 79 ans DECELLES, Marie (I3564)
 
185 79 years MACLEOD, Eunice (I3858)
 
186 80 ans OLIVIER, Agnès (I3761)
 
187 80 ans POLIQUIN, Jean (I3665)
 
188 80 ans BLANCHON, Etienne (I3381)
 
189 80 ans LANGLOIS, Noël (I2722)
 
190 84 ans GOSSELIN, Gabriel (I2354)
 
191 85 yrs MACDONALD, Donald (I3852)
 
192 85ans GODIN, Laurent d. Beauséjour et Châtillon (I3103)
 
193 86 ans MORIN, Pierre (I1161)
 
194 86 ans, 22 ans en 1667, 20 ans en 1666, 35 ans en 1681 LAVERDURE, Marguerite (I4201)
 
195 88 years MACDONALD, Angus (I1220)
 
196 89 ans BOURASSA, Jean (I4651)
 
197 978 duke, 987-991 westFrankish pretender to the throne. DE FRANCE, Charles (I5235)
 
198 a "Rich Blessing to this church scores of years" (Plymouth) CUSHMAN, Thomas (I965)
 
199 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I792)
 
200 a cause de sa petite taille GRAVEL, Joseph-Massé d. Brindelière (I3778)
 

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